Ethics and Culture Cast

Ethics and Culture Cast
By Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture
About this podcast
Lively conversations with professors, fellows, scholars, and friends of the University of Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture. The Center is committed to sharing the richness of the Catholic moral and intellectual tradition through teaching, research, and dialogue, at the highest level and across a range of disciplines. For more information visit http://ethicscenter.nd.edu
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Ethics and Culture Cast

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Latest episodes
Feb. 8, 2018
In this episode, we sit down with George Weigel, the distinguished senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and one of our permanent research fellows at the ND Center for Ethics and Culture. We talk about several of his books including his most recent, "Lessons In Hope: My Unexpected Life with St. John Paul II," 2004's "Letters to a Young Catholic," and his wonderful Lenten vademecum from 2013, "Roman Pilgrimage: The Station Churches."Special Guest: George Weigel.Links:Weigel's Full Bio at EPPC — George Weigel, Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is a Catholic theologian and one of America’s leading public intellectuals. He holds EPPC’s William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. From 1989 through June 1996, Mr. Weigel was president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he led a wide-ranging, ecumenical and inter-religious program of research and publication on foreign and domestic policy issues. From June 1996, as a Senior Fellow, Mr. Weigel prepared a major study of the life, thought, and action of Pope John Paul II. Witness to Hope: The Biography of Pope John Paul II was published to international acclaim in the fall of 1999, and has since been translated into twelve languages, with a Chinese edition currently in progress.George Weigel Author's Page at AmazonTheme Music: "I dunno" by Grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Jan. 25, 2018
Randall B. Smith is a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in Houston, and was the CEC's Myser Visiting Research Fellow when he began writing Reading the Sermons of Thomas Aquinas: A Beginner's Guide. We chat about the preaching style of the 13th Century, and what it can teach us today.Special Guest: Randall Smith.Links:Reading the Sermons of Thomas Aquinas: A Beginner's Guide — Preaching was immensely important in the medieval Church, and Thomas Aquinas expended much time and effort preaching. Today, however, Aquinas's sermons remain relatively unstudied and underappreciated. This is largely because their sermo modernus style, typical of the thirteenth century, can appear odd and inaccessible to the modern reader. In Reading the Sermons of Thomas Aquinas, Randall Smith guides the reader through Aquinas's sermons, explaining their form and content. In the process, one comes to appreciate the sermons in their rhetorical brilliance, beauty, and profound spiritual depth while simultaneously being initiated into a fascinating world of thought concerning Scripture, language, and the human mind. The book also includes analytical outlines for all of Aquinas's extant sermons.Theme Music: "I dunno" by Grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Jan. 18, 2018
n this episode, we sit down with Nicole Stelle Garnett, a member of the Center's Faculty Advisory Committee and professor at Notre Dame Law School. We discuss the role of Catholic schools in forming strong communities, the vocation of teaching, and how the interdisciplinary collegiality that the Center for Ethics and Culture helps foster on campus works to strengthen Notre Dame's authentic Catholic mission and identity.Special Guest: Nicole Stelle Garnett.Links:Nicole Stelle Garnett at ND Law School — Nicole Stelle Garnett’s teaching and research focus on property, land use, urban development, local government law, and education policy. She is the author of numerous articles on these subjects and of Ordering the City: Land Use, Policing and the Restoration of Urban America (Yale University Press, 2009). Her most recent book, Lost Classroom, Lost Community: Catholic Schools' Importance in Urban America (University of Chicago Press, 2014) represents the culmination of a major empirical research project with Professor Peg Brinig examining the effects of Catholic school closures on urban neighborhoods.CEC Faculty Advisory Committee — The Faculty Advisory Committee is composed of scholars from departments across the university that gives input regarding the Center’s scholarly programming and publications.Theme Music: "I dunno" by Grapes — (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Dec. 14, 2017
In this episode, we sit down with New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, who joined us on campus this past October for a roundtable discussion about Disarming Beauty, the second volume in our book series Catholic Ideas for a Secular World. In our conversation, we talked about his work at the New York Times, the influence of G. K. Chesterton on his own conversion, and the vocation of the Catholic journalist.Special Guest: Ross Douthat.Links:Ross Douthat at the New York Times — Ross Douthat joined The New York Times as an Op-Ed columnist in April 2009. His column appears every Wednesday and Sunday.A Conversation with Fr. Julián Carrón featuring Ross Douthat, Ernest Morrell, and Paolo Carroza — Fr. Julián Carrón, author of Disarming Beauty, was be the featured guest at a discussion about his bestselling book. The roundtable featured Ross Douthat (Columnist, New York Times), Paolo Carozza (Kellogg Institute, Notre Dame) and Ernest Morrell (Center for Literacy Education, Notre Dame), followed by an author book signing. Disarming Beauty is the second volume in the Center for Ethics and Culture's series "Catholic Ideas for a Secular World," published by the University of Notre Dame Press.Who is G. K. Chesterton? (by Dale Ahlquist, American Chesterton Society) — I’ve heard the question more than once. It is asked by people who have just started to discover G.K. Chesterton. They have begun reading a Chesterton book, or perhaps have seen an issue of Gilbert, or maybe they’ve only encountered a series of pithy quotations that marvelously articulate some forgotten bit of common sense. They ask the question with a mixture of wonder, gratitude and…resentment. They are amazed by what they have discovered. They are thankful to have discovered it. And they are almost angry that it has taken so long for them to make the discovery.G. K. Chesterton's poem dedicated to Notre Dame: "The Arena" — The Chesterton party arrived at Notre Dame on the evening of October 4th, 1930. The lectures began on the following Monday. On Friday, the 10th, in the evening, the stadium was solemnly dedicated. Navy had come on for the dedicatory game, and Father O'Donnell was busy with them. He had told Johnny Mangan, the University chauffeur, to look after the Chestertons, and to see that they got into the stadium and that Mr. Chesterton had a seat on the platform from which the speeches were to be made. There were about twenty thousand people present, and when the students saw the magnificent bulk of Chesterton going toward the platform, they cheered wildly: "He's a man! Who's a man? He's a Notre Dame man!" Chesterton turned nervously to Mangan, saying: "My, they're angry!" "Angry!" exclaimed Johnny, "Golly man, they're cheerin' you!" Whereat Chesterton began such a fit of laughing and sputtering as almost to choke himself.Theme Music: "I dunno" by Grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Nov. 30, 2017
In this episode, we chat with John O'Callaghan, associate professor of philosophy, Director of the Jacques Maritain Center, and the 2017-18 Mary Ann Remick Senior Visiting Fellow at the Center for Ethics and Culture. We talk about teaching St. Thomas Aquinas to undergraduates, the work he's undertaking as the CEC's Remick Fellow, and the continuing relevance of St. Thomas Aquinas.Special Guest: John O'Callaghan.Links:Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas — The Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas carries out a specific mission, which is to carry out research into, to defend, and to disseminate the doctrine of the Angelic Doctor, and, taking due account of contemporary cultural traditions, 'to develop further this part of Thomistic doctrine which deals with humanity, given that his assertions on the dignity of the human person and the use of his reason, in perfect harmony with the faith, make St. Thomas a teacher for our time' (Inter Munera Academiarum, n. 4).ND Center for Ethics and Culture Fellows — The CEC has several types of fellowships for established and rising scholars, including two endowed fellowships: the Mary Ann Remick Senior Visiting Fellow and the Myser Fellow.Theme Music: "I dunno" by Grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Nov. 16, 2017
Our guest is Alyson Cox, the CEC's Law & Public Policy Fellow for 2017-18. We chat about her experience in the CEC's Sorin Fellows program, the internships that she undertook while at the Center, and her work as the president of Notre Dame Right to Life, the largest student club on campus.Special Guest: Aly Cox.Links:Notre Dame Right to Life (Facebook) — The Facebook home of the Notre Dame Right to Life Club.Pontifical Academy for Life — The Pontifical Academy for Life, founded by Pope John Paul II, exists for the promotion and defense of human life, especially regarding bioethics as it regards Christian morality.The Rimini Meeting of Friendship Amongst Peoples — The Meeting for the Friendship Amongst Peoples was born in 1980. An encounter among persons of different faiths and cultures. A place for friendship where peace, socialization, and a friendship among peoples may be established. These are encounters born from people that share a tension towards what is true, good, and beautiful.Theme music: "I dunno" by grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Nov. 9, 2017
David Solomon, the founding director of the Center for Ethics and Culture, began his legendary career at Notre Dame in 1968 and retired in May 2016. During his tenure, he served as the director of undergraduate studies in the philosophy department, founded and directed the Arts & Letters/Science Honors Program, and directed the Notre Dame London Program. In addition to his service in academic administration, he taught ethics and medical ethics to thousands of undergraduate and graduate students and directed more than 40 doctoral dissertations. Professor Solomon established the Center for Ethics and Culture in 1999 with the aim of bringing "the great treasures of the Catholic moral and intellectual tradition to bear upon the most pressing ethical questions of the day." He handed the reins of the Center to current director Carter Snead in 2012.Special Guest: David Solomon.Links:The CEC's David Solomon Fellowship — Director O. Carter Snead announced the establishment of a $1.25 million endowed graduate student fellowship honoring the Center's founding director, David Solomon. "Professor Solomon is the visionary who had the will, the creativity, the insight, the judgment, and the energy to create the Center for Ethics and Culture so many years ago," said Snead. "We are very pleased that, in perpetuity, there will be a David Solomon Fellow in the College of Arts and Letters who will share David's passion for the Catholic mission of the University of Notre Dame." (Dateline: December 1, 2016)Theme music: "I dunno" by grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Oct. 26, 2017
Brad S. Gregory is Professor of History and Dorothy G. Griffin Collegiate Chair at the University of Notre Dame, where he has taught since 2003. From 1996-2003 he taught at Stanford University, where he received early tenure in 2001. He specializes in the history of Christianity in Europe during the Reformation era and on the long-term influence of the Reformation era on the modern world. His latest book, "Rebel in the Ranks", discusses Martin Luther and the foundations of the Reformation.Special Guest: Brad Gregory.Links:Rebel in the Ranks — How Luther inadvertently fractured the Catholic Church and reconfigured Western civilization is at the heart of renowned historian Brad Gregory’s Rebel in the Ranks. While recasting the portrait of Luther as a deliberate revolutionary, Gregory describes the cultural, political, and intellectual trends that informed him and helped give rise to the Reformation, which led to conflicting interpretations of the Bible, as well as the rise of competing churches, political conflicts, and social upheavals across Europe. Over the next five hundred years, as Gregory’s account shows, these conflicts eventually contributed to further epochal changes—from the Enlightenment and self-determination to moral relativism, modern capitalism, and consumerism, and in a cruel twist to Luther’s legacy, the freedom of every man and woman to practice no religion at all. Theme music: "I dunno" by grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/grapes/16626 Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Oct. 12, 2017
Professor Sean Kelsey is an associate professor of philosophy and the chair of the Center's Faculty Advisory Committee. He is on sabbatical in 2017-18, writing a book on Aristotle's De Anima with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. We discuss the writing process, the Center's student formation work, and the role of the Center in supporting the Notre Dame's Catholic identity.Special Guest: Sean Kelsey.Links:Theme music: "I dunno" by grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. Ft: J Lang, Morusque
Sept. 28, 2017
In this first episode of Ethics and Culture Cast, we chat with O. Carter Snead, the William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture. In addition to directing the work of the NDCEC, Snead is a professor of law and concurrent professor of political science at Notre Dame. In this conversation, Professor Snead talks about the Center's mission to share the richness of the Catholic moral and intellectual tradition across a variety of disciplines, and at the highest level.Special Guest: Carter Snead.Links:ND Center for Ethics and CultureTheme music: "I dunno" by grapes — I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/grapes/16626 Ft: J Lang, Morusque