Alasdair Roberts - Hearsay Culture Show #198 - KZSU-FM (Stanford)

About this episode   English    United States

I am pleased to post Show 198, my interview with Prof. Alasdair Roberts, author of The End of Protest. Al's book addresses a vexing question: why, in the face of an unprecedented financial crisis, have we not seen massive protests in the street? In this study, Al posits that a combination of regulatory, social and technological forces have created this state of affairs. In our discussion, we examined the depths of this problem and what it means for speech and government operations in the future. As always, I greatly enjoyed the discussion!

{Hearsay Culture is a talk show on KZSU-FM, Stanford, 90.1 FM, hosted by Center for Internet & Society Resident Fellow David S. Levine. The show includes guests and focuses on the intersection of technology and society. How is our world impacted by the great technological changes taking place? Each week, a different sphere is explored. For more information, please go to http://hearsayculture.com.}
In this podcast

Alasdair Roberts

Machine generated. There may be errors. Report errors to us.
Transcript
Transcribe this episode
We transcribe podcasts (Example). Transcribing the whole Internet's podcasts takes time... Please help us prioritize what episodes to transcribe.
About this podcast
By Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society
The Center for Internet and Society (CIS) is a public interest technology law and policy program at Stanford Law School that brings together scholars, academics, legislators, students, programmers, security researchers, and scientists to study the interaction of new technologies and the law and to examine how the synergy between the two can either promote or harm public goods like free speech, privacy, public commons, diversity, and scientific inquiry. The CIS strives as well to improve both technology and law, encouraging decision makers to design both as a means to further democratic values.
Disclaimer: The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.