Cloud Engineering – Software Engineering Daily

Cloud Engineering – Software Engineering Daily
By Cloud Engineering – Software Engineering Daily
About this podcast
Technical interviews about software topics.

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Nov. 16, 2017
A popular software application serves billions of user requests. These requests could be for many different things. These requests need to be routed to the correct destination, load balanced across different instances of a service, and queued for processing. Processing a request might require generating a detailed response to the user, or making a write to a database, or the creation of a new file on a file system. As a software product grows in popularity, it will need to scale these different parts of infrastructure at different rates. You many not need to grow your database cluster at the same pace that you grow the number of load balancers at the front of your infrastructure. Your users might start making 70% of their requests to one specific part of your application, and you might need to scale up the services that power that portion of the infrastructure. Today’s episode is a case study of a high-volume application: a monitoring platform called Raygun. Raygun’s software runs on client applications and delivers monitoring data and crash reports back to Raygun’s servers. If I have a podcast player application on my iPhone that runs the Raygun software, and that application crashes, Raygun takes a snapshot of the system state and reports that information along with the exception, so that the developer of that podcast player application can see the full picture of what was going on in the user’s device, along with the exception that triggered the application crash. Throughout the day, applications all around the world are crashing and sending requests to Rayguns servers. Even when crashes are not occurring, Raygun is receiving monitoring and health data from those applications. Raygun’s infrastructure routes those different types of requests to different services, queues them up, and writes the data to multiple storage layers–ElasticSearch, a relational SQL database, and a custom file server built on top of S3. John-Daniel Trask is the CEO of Raygun and he joins the show to describe the end-to-end architecture of Raygun’s request processing and storage system. We also explore specific refactoring changes that were made to save costs at the worker layer of the architecture. This is useful memory management strategy for anyone working in a garbage collected language. If you would like to see diagrams that explain the architecture and other technical decisions, the show notes have a video that explains what we talk about in this show. Full disclosure: Raygun is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Transferwise makes it cheaper and easier to send money to other countries. It’s a simple mission, but it’s important. TransferWise is looking for engineers to join their team. We have reported on TransferWise in past episodes, and I love the company, because they make international payments more efficient. If you are a Java developer, a full-stack engineer, a product manager, or a data analyst, check out transferwise.com/jobs. Last year, TransferWise’s VP of engineering Harsh Sinha came on Software Engineering Daily to discuss how TransferWise works–and it was a fascinating discussion. Every month, tens of thousands of people send about 1 billion dollars, in 45 currencies, to 64 countries on TransferWise. Along the way, there are many engineering challenges–so there’s plenty of opportunity to make your mark, and learn about the evolving industry of financial technology. TransferWise is built by self-sufficient, autonomous teams, and each team picks the problems they want to solve. There’s no micro-management. No one telling you what to do. Find an autonomous, challenging, rewarding job by going to transferwise.com/jobs. TransferWise has several open roles in engineering, and has offices in London, New York, Tampa, Tallin, Cherkassy, Budapest, and Singapore, among other places. Find out more at transferwise.com/jobs. Dice helps you accelerate your tech career. Whether you’re actively looking for a job or need insights to grow in your role, Dice has the resources you need. Dice’s mobile app is the fastest and easiest way to get ahead. Search thousands of tech jobs – from software engineering to UI/UX to product management. Discover your worth with Dice’s Salary Predictor based on your unique skill set. Uncover new opportunities with Dice’s new career pathing tool which can give you insights about the best types of roles to transition to – and the skills you’ll need to get there. Manage your tech career and download the Dice Careers app on Android or iOS today. So check out Dice and support Software Engineering Daily, go to Dice.com/sedaily. Thanks to Dice for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. Simplify continuous delivery with GoCD, the on-premise, open source, continuous delivery tool by ThoughtWorks. With GoCD, you can easily model complex deployment workflows using pipelines and visualize them end-to-end with the Value Stream Map. You get complete visibility into and control of your company’s deployments. At gocd.org/sedaily, find out how to bring continuous delivery to your teams. Say goodbye to deployment panic and hello to consistent, predictable deliveries. Visit gocd.org/sedaily to learn more about GoCD. Commercial support and enterprise add-ons, including disaster recovery, are available.  
Nov. 15, 2017
As the gig economy grows, that growth necessitates innovations in the online infrastructure powering these new labor markets. In our previous episodes about Uber, we explored the systems that balance server load and gather geospacial data. In our coverage of Lyft, we studied Envoy, the service proxy that standardizes communications and load balancing among services. In shows about Airbnb, we talked about the data engineering pipeline that powers economic calculations, user studies, and everything else that requires a MapReduce. In today’s episode, we explore the business and engineering behind another online labor platform: Fiverr. Fiverr is a marketplace for digital services. On Fiverr, I have purchased podcast editing, logo creation, music lyrics, videos, and sales leads. I have found people who will work for cheap, and quickly finish a job to my exact specification. I have discovered visual artists who worked with me to craft a music video for a song I wrote. Workers on Fiverr post “gigs”–jobs that they can perform. Most of the workers on Fiverr specialize in knowledge work, like proofreading or gathering sales leads. The workers are all over the world. I have worked with people from Germany, the Philippines, and Africa through Fiverr. Fiverr has become the leader in digital freelancing. The staggering growth of Fiverr’s marketplace has put the company in a position similar to an early Amazon. There is room for strategic expansion, but there is also an urgency to improve the infrastructure and secure the market lead. Gil Scheinfeld is the CTO at Fiverr, and he joins the show to explain how the teams at Fiverr are organized to fulfill the two goals of strategic, creative growth and continuous improvement to the platform. One engineering topic we discussed at length was event sourcing. Event sourcing is a pattern for modeling each change to your application as an event. Each event is placed on a pub/sub messaging queue, and made available to the different systems within your company. Event sourcing creates a centralized place to listen to all of the changes that are occurring within your company. For example, you might be working on a service that allows a customer to make a payment to a worker. The payment becomes an event. Several different systems might want to listen for that event. Fiverr needs to call out to a credit card processing system. Fiverr also needs to send an email to the worker, to let them know they have been paid. Fiverr ALSO needs to update internal accounting records. Event sourcing is useful because the creator of the event is decoupled from all of the downstream consumers. As the platform engineering team works to build out event sourcing, communications between different service owners will become more efficient. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Amazon Redshift powers the analytics of your business–and Intermix.io powers the analytics of your Redshift. Intermix.io gives you the tools you need to analyze your Amazon Redshift performance and improve the toolchain of everyone downstream from your data warehouse. The team at Intermix has seen so many Redshift clusters, they are confident they can solve whatever performance issues you are having. Go to intermix.io/sedaily to get a free 30-day trial. Intermix collects all your Redshift logs and makes it easy to figure out what’s wrong so you can take action. All in a nice, intuitive dashboard. Go to intermix.io/sedaily to start your free 30-day trial. Transferwise makes it cheaper and easier to send money to other countries. It’s a simple mission, but it’s important. TransferWise is looking for engineers to join their team. We have reported on TransferWise in past episodes, and I love the company, because they make international payments more efficient. If you are a Java developer, a full-stack engineer, a product manager, or a data analyst, check out transferwise.com/jobs. Last year, TransferWise’s VP of engineering Harsh Sinha came on Software Engineering Daily to discuss how TransferWise works–and it was a fascinating discussion. Every month, tens of thousands of people send about 1 billion dollars, in 45 currencies, to 64 countries on TransferWise. Along the way, there are many engineering challenges–so there’s plenty of opportunity to make your mark, and learn about the evolving industry of financial technology. TransferWise is built by self-sufficient, autonomous teams, and each team picks the problems they want to solve. There’s no micro-management. No one telling you what to do. Find an autonomous, challenging, rewarding job by going to transferwise.com/jobs. TransferWise has several open roles in engineering, and has offices in London, New York, Tampa, Tallin, Cherkassy, Budapest, and Singapore, among other places. Find out more at transferwise.com/jobs. Spring Framework gives developers an environment for building cloud native projects. On December 4th-7th, SpringOne Platform is coming to San Francisco. SpringOne Platform is a conference where developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the Spring ecosystem and beyond. Speakers at SpringOne Platform include Eric Brewer (who created the CAP theorem), Vaughn Vernon (who writes extensively about Domain Driven Design), and many thought leaders in the Spring Ecosystem. SpringOne Platform is the premier conference for those who build, deploy, and run cloud-native software. Software Engineering Daily listeners can sign up with the discount code SEDaily100 and receive $100 off of a Spring One Platform conference pass. I will also be at SpringOne reporting on developments in the cloud native ecosystem. Join me December 4th-7th at the SpringOne Platform conference, and use discount code SEDaily100 for $100 off your conference pass.
Nov. 14, 2017
In an event driven application, each component of application logic emits events, which other parts of the application respond to. We have examined this pattern in previous shows that focus on pub/sub messaging, event sourcing, and CQRS. In today’s show, we examine the intersection of event driven architecture and serverless architecture. Serverless applications can be built by combining functions-as-a-service (like AWS Lambda) together with backend as a service tools like DynamoDB and Auth0. Functions-as-a-service give you cheap, flexible, scalable compute. Backend as a service tools give you robust, fault-tolerant tools for managing state. By combining these sets of tools, we can build applications without thinking about specific servers that are managing large portions of our application logic. This is great–because managing servers and doing load balancing and scaling is painful. With this shift in architecture, we also have to change how data flows through our applications. Danilo Poccia is the author of AWS Lambda In Action, a book about building event-driven serverless applications. In today’s episode, Danilo and I discuss the connection between serverless architecture and event driven architecture. We start by reviewing the evolution of the runtime unit–from physical machines to virtual machines to containers to functions as a service. Then, we dive into what it means for an application to be “event driven.” We explore how to architect and scale a serverless architecture, and we finish by discussing the future of serverless–how IoT and edge computing and on-premise architectures will take advantage of this new technology. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Auth0 makes authentication easy.  As a developer, you love building things that are fun–and authentication is not fun. Authentication is a pain. It can take hours to implement, and even once you have authentication, you have to keep all your authentication code up to date! Auth0 is the easiest and fastest way to implement real world authentication and authorization architectures into your apps and APIs. Allow your users to log in however you want–regular username and password, Facebook, Twitter, enterprise identity providers like AD and Office 365–or let them login without passwords, using an email login like Slack or phone login like WhatsApp. Getting started is easy. Just grab the Auth0 SDK for any platform you need and add a few lines of code to your project–whether you are building a mobile app, a website, or an API–they all need authentication. Sign up for Auth0 and get the free plan or try the enterprise plan for 21 days at auth0.io/sedaily. No credit card required. Auth0 is trusted by developers at Atlassian, Mozilla, and Wall Street Journal. Try it out at auth0.io/sedaily. Stop struggling with authentication–get back to building core features, with Auth0.  Thank you to our sponsor, Datadog, a SaaS cloud monitoring platform for cloud infrastructure and applications. Datadog integrates seamlessly with more than 200 technologies, including AWS Lambda. With powerful visualizations, sophisticated alerting, distributed tracing and APM, Datadog helps you get a handle on the performance of your serverless applications, as well as their underlying infrastructure. Start a free trial today & Datadog will send you a free T-shirt! Visit softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog to get started.  Simplify continuous delivery with GoCD, the on-premise, open source, continuous delivery tool by ThoughtWorks. With GoCD, you can easily model complex deployment workflows using pipelines and visualize them end-to-end with the Value Stream Map. You get complete visibility into and control of your company’s deployments. At gocd.org/sedaily, find out how to bring continuous delivery to your teams. Say goodbye to deployment panic and hello to consistent, predictable deliveries. Visit gocd.org/sedaily to learn more about GoCD. Commercial support and enterprise add-ons, including disaster recovery, are available.
Nov. 8, 2017
Cryptocurrencies give us a decentralized financial system. OpenBazaar is a decentralized commerce system. A merchant can log onto OpenBazaar and post a listing for an item–for example, a t-shirt that I want to sell for $15. My item listing will spread throughout the OpenBazaar P2P network. A shopper can download the OpenBazaar desktop application and see my listing for a t-shirt. The shopper can pay me $15 in bitcoin, and I will send the t-shirt to their address. If I were selling that shirt on Amazon, the corporation would take a cut of that transaction. OpenBazaar has no transaction costs–so users get to save some money. However, users also miss out on the benefits of a corporate marketplace. Amazon makes sure that the seller will send the item to the buyer, and makes sure that the buyer pays the seller. On OpenBazaar, an escrow system is needed to place money in the hands of a neutral third party until the goods are delivered. Amazon ensures that the distributor sends the item to the customer. On OpenBazaar, users need to figure out how to send the goods to each other. Brian Hoffman was the first developer to start working on OpenBazaar. The project has grown significantly since his initial commit, and OpenBazaar now has buyers, sellers, and open source committers. There is a clear desire for an open system of commerce.  Brian is also the CEO of OB1, a company that provides services on top of OpenBazaar. OpenBazaar is a protocol–and other companies will undoubtedly emerge to build on top of it as well. In our conversation, Brian discussed how OpenBazaar works–the peer-to-peer protocol, the escrow system, the dispute resolution, and the open source community management. It is a fascinating, unique project, and I hope you learn something about it from this episode. To find all of our old episodes about decentralized technology and blockchains, you can download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and for Android. In other podcast players, you can only access the most recent 100 episodes. With these apps, we are building a new way to consume content about software engineering. They are open-sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to get involved with, we would love to get your help. Shout out to today’s featured open source contributor Justin Lam. He has been working on improving the iOS codebase, and I know all the SE Daily mobile users appreciate his effort. Thanks Justin! Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily. Spring Framework gives developers an environment for building cloud native projects. On December 4th-7th, SpringOne Platform is coming to San Francisco. SpringOne Platform is a conference where developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the Spring ecosystem and beyond. Speakers at SpringOne Platform include Eric Brewer (who created the CAP theorem), Vaughn Vernon (who writes extensively about Domain Driven Design), and many thought leaders in the Spring Ecosystem. SpringOne Platform is the premier conference for those who build, deploy, and run cloud-native software. Software Engineering Daily listeners can sign up with the discount code SEDaily100 and receive $100 off of a Spring One Platform conference pass. I will also be at SpringOne reporting on developments in the cloud native ecosystem. Join me December 4th-7th at the SpringOne Platform conference, and use discount code SEDaily100 for $100 off your conference pass. Incapsula can protect your API servers and microservices from responding to unwanted requests. To try Incapsula for yourself, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and get a free enterprise trial of Incapsula. Incapsula’s API gives you control over the security and performance of your application–whether you have a complex microservices architecture or a WordPress site, like Software Engineering Daily. Incapsula has a global network of over 30 data centers that optimize routing and cache your content. The same network of data centers that are filtering your content for attackers are operating as a CDN, and speeding up your application. To try Incapsula today, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and check it out. Thanks again, Incapsula. Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.    
Nov. 7, 2017
The Netflix API is accessed by developers who build for over 1000 device types: TVs, smartphontes, VR headsets, laptops. If it has a screen, it can probably run Netflix. On each of these different devices, the Netflix experience is different. Different screen sizes mean there is variable space to display the content. When you open up Netflix, you want to efficiently browse through movies. The frontend engineers who are building different experiences for different device types need to make different requests to the backend to fetch the right amount of data. This was the engineering problem that Vasanth Asokan and his team at Netflix was tasked with solving: how do you enable lots of different frontend engineers to get whatever they need from the backend? This problem led to the development of a “serverless-like platform” within Netflix, which Vasanth wrote about in a few popular articles on Medium. This platform enables frontend developers to write and deploy backend scripts to fetch data, decoupling the responsibilities of frontend engineers and backend engineers. The tight coupling of frontend and backend engineering was problematic to the development velocity of Netflix. We have done many shows about Netflix engineering, covering topics like data engineering, user interface design, and performance monitoring. To find these old episodes, you can download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and for Android. With these apps, we are building a new way to consume content about software engineering. They are open-sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to get involved with, we would love to get your help. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Auth0 makes authentication easy.  As a developer, you love building things that are fun–and authentication is not fun. Authentication is a pain. It can take hours to implement, and even once you have authentication, you have to keep all your authentication code up to date! Auth0 is the easiest and fastest way to implement real world authentication and authorization architectures into your apps and APIs. Allow your users to log in however you want–regular username and password, Facebook, Twitter, enterprise identity providers like AD and Office 365–or let them login without passwords, using an email login like Slack or phone login like WhatsApp. Getting started is easy. Just grab the Auth0 SDK for any platform you need and add a few lines of code to your project–whether you are building a mobile app, a website, or an API–they all need authentication. Sign up for Auth0 and get the free plan or try the enterprise plan for 21 days at auth0.io/sedaily. No credit card required. Auth0 is trusted by developers at Atlassian, Mozilla, and Wall Street Journal. Try it out at auth0.io/sedaily. Stop struggling with authentication–get back to building core features, with Auth0.  Amazon Redshift powers the analytics of your business–and Intermix.io powers the analytics of your Redshift. Intermix.io gives you the tools you need to analyze your Amazon Redshift performance and improve the toolchain of everyone downstream from your data warehouse. The team at Intermix has seen so many Redshift clusters, they are confident they can solve whatever performance issues you are having. Go to intermix.io/sedaily to get a free 30-day trial. Intermix collects all your Redshift logs and makes it easy to figure out what’s wrong so you can take action. All in a nice, intuitive dashboard. Go to intermix.io/sedaily to start your free 30-day trial. Dice helps you accelerate your tech career. Whether you’re actively looking for a job or need insights to grow in your role, Dice has the resources you need. Dice’s mobile app is the fastest and easiest way to get ahead. Search thousands of tech jobs – from software engineering to UI/UX to product management. Discover your worth with Dice’s Salary Predictor based on your unique skill set. Uncover new opportunities with Dice’s new career pathing tool which can give you insights about the best types of roles to transition to – and the skills you’ll need to get there. Manage your tech career and download the Dice Careers app on Android or iOS today. So check out Dice and support Software Engineering Daily, go to Dice.com/sedaily. Thanks to Dice for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. Spring Framework gives developers an environment for building cloud native projects. On December 4th-7th, SpringOne Platform is coming to San Francisco. SpringOne Platform is a conference where developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the Spring ecosystem and beyond. Speakers at SpringOne Platform include Eric Brewer (who created the CAP theorem), Vaughn Vernon (who writes extensively about Domain Driven Design), and many thought leaders in the Spring Ecosystem. SpringOne Platform is the premier conference for those who build, deploy, and run cloud-native software. Software Engineering Daily listeners can sign up with the discount code SEDaily100 and receive $100 off of a Spring One Platform conference pass. I will also be at SpringOne reporting on developments in the cloud native ecosystem. Join me December 4th-7th at the SpringOne Platform conference, and use discount code SEDaily100 for $100 off your conference pass.  
Nov. 6, 2017
Serverless architecture is software that runs without an addressable server. Serverless is made possible by two types of technology: platform as a service providers like Auth0, and functions as a service like AWS Lambda. With both of these technologies, we can program logic that runs without being deployed to a server. Functions as a service are cheap and scalable. Write your code for a Serverless function, and the cloud provider will cheaply deploy and execute that function on some server somewhere. The difficult part is maintaining state. Since Serverless compute instances are ephemeral, you aren’t dealing with a system that will keep track of your state—it is going to disappear eventually. The ephemeral nature of Serverless code requires us to shift our thinking—but the dramatic cost and simplified scalability make it well worth the effort. Serverless functions can add complexity in exchange for lower price. Serverless “platform as a service” often lowers complexity at a slightly higher price. A Serverless database like Firebase handles database scaling and gives you a nice web interface. A Serverless machine learning platform like Google CloudML gives your models scalability and controlled deployment. A Serverless authentication service like Auth0 manages your authentication. In addition to authentication, Auth0 has built a set of tools to allow SaaS companies to extend their platforms into a sandboxed code execution environment. Bobby Johnson is an engineer at Auth0, and he joins the show to describe the toolbox that Auth0 has developed: authentication, webtasks, and extensibility–and how the world of “serverless” architecture is evolving. Full disclosure, Auth0 is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Simplify continuous delivery with GoCD, the on-premise, open source, continuous delivery tool by ThoughtWorks. With GoCD, you can easily model complex deployment workflows using pipelines and visualize them end-to-end with the Value Stream Map. You get complete visibility into and control of your company’s deployments. At gocd.org/sedaily, find out how to bring continuous delivery to your teams. Say goodbye to deployment panic and hello to consistent, predictable deliveries. Visit gocd.org/sedaily to learn more about GoCD. Commercial support and enterprise add-ons, including disaster recovery, are available. Incapsula can protect your API servers and microservices from responding to unwanted requests. To try Incapsula for yourself, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and get a free enterprise trial of Incapsula. Incapsula’s API gives you control over the security and performance of your application–whether you have a complex microservices architecture or a WordPress site, like Software Engineering Daily. Incapsula has a global network of over 30 data centers that optimize routing and cache your content. The same network of data centers that are filtering your content for attackers are operating as a CDN, and speeding up your application. To try Incapsula today, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and check it out. Thanks again, Incapsula. Digital Ocean Spaces gives you simple object storage with a beautiful user interface. You need an easy way to host objects like images and videos. Your users need to upload objects like pdfs and music files. To try Digital Ocean Spaces, go to do.co/sedaily and get 2 months of Spaces plus a $10 credit to use on any other Digital Ocean products–and you get this credit even if you have been with Digital Ocean for awhile. It’s a nice added bonus just for trying out Spaces. If you become a customer, the pricing is simple:  $5 per month price and includes 250GB of storage and 1TB of outbound bandwidth. There are no costs per request and additional storage is priced at the lowest rate available: $0.01 per GB transferred and $0.02 per GB stored. There won’t be any surprises on your bill. Digital Ocean simplifies the cloud–they look for every opportunity to remove friction from a developer’s experience. I love it, and I think you will too–check it out at do.co/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.    
Nov. 1, 2017
Augmented reality applications are slowly making their way into the world of the consumer. Pokemon Go created the magical experience of seeing Pokemon superimposed upon the real world. IKEA’s mobile app lets you see how a couch would fit into your living room, which has a significant improvement on the furniture buying process. Augmented reality applications can have even more dramatic impact on industrial enterprises. Have you ever set up a factory? You might need to build a conveyor belt. You might need to put together the parts of a giant machine that extrudes steel. You might need to fix a silicon wafer fabrication machine. It takes an expert to set up these heavy, complicated machines. ScopeAR is a company that builds augmented reality tools. One of the ScopeAR products allows users to telepresence with each other to collaborate on the construction and maintenance of heavy machinery. Imagine I am setting up my factory, and I have a complicated piece of machinery (let’s say a conveyor belt) in front of me. I have never constructed a conveyor belt before. I put on a HoloLens, and set up a VoIP call with an expert who has experience with that piece of machinery, and they point out what I need to do by superimposing 3-D arrows, text, and other instructions on my field of vision. They can share my experience and help guide me through the process. This is such a flexible tool–you can imagine applications for augmented reality assistance being useful in medicine, construction, education and other fields. Scott Montgomerie is the CEO of ScopeAR and in today’s episode, we talk about the state of AR, how the AR tools from Apple and Google compare, and how the similarity between tools used for mapping the world in AR relate to the tools used to map the world by autonomous cars. Scott was a great guest, and I hope to have him back on in the future. We have done some great shows about how to build augmented reality and virtual reality applications. To find these old episodes, you can download the Software Engineering Daily app for iOS and for Android. In other podcast players, you can only access the most recent 100 episodes. With these apps, we are building a new way to consume content about software engineering. They are open-sourced at github.com/softwareengineeringdaily. If you are looking for an open source project to get involved with, we would love to get your help. Shout out to today’s featured contributor Edgar Pino. He is working on a real-time chat application for Software Engineering Daily, so that we can have chat rooms for people to discuss the episodes easily. Innovative work! Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily. Incapsula can protect your API servers and microservices from responding to unwanted requests. To try Incapsula for yourself, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and get a free enterprise trial of Incapsula. Incapsula’s API gives you control over the security and performance of your application–whether you have a complex microservices architecture or a WordPress site, like Software Engineering Daily. Incapsula has a global network of over 30 data centers that optimize routing and cache your content. The same network of data centers that are filtering your content for attackers are operating as a CDN, and speeding up your application. To try Incapsula today, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and check it out. Thanks again, Incapsula. When your application is failing on a user’s device, how do you find out about it? Raygun lets you see every problem in your software and how to fix it. Raygun brings together crash reporting, real user monitoring, user tracking, and deployment tracking. See every error and crash affecting your users right now. Monitor your deployments, to make sure that a release is not impacting users in new ways. And track your users through your application to identify the bad experiences they are having. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun, and get a free 14 day trial to try out Raygun and find the errors that are occurring in your applications today. Raygun is used by Microsoft, Slack, and Unity to monitor their customer facing software. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun and try it out for yourself. Simplify continuous delivery with GoCD, the on-premise, open source, continuous delivery tool by ThoughtWorks. With GoCD, you can easily model complex deployment workflows using pipelines and visualize them end-to-end with the Value Stream Map. You get complete visibility into and control of your company’s deployments. At gocd.org/sedaily, find out how to bring continuous delivery to your teams. Say goodbye to deployment panic and hello to consistent, predictable deliveries. Visit gocd.org/sedaily to learn more about GoCD. Commercial support and enterprise add-ons, including disaster recovery, are available.  
Oct. 31, 2017
Computational load is the amount of demand that is being placed on a computer system. “Load” can take the form of memory, CPU, network bandwidth, disk space, and other finite resources. When we design systems, we need to prepare for high-load events. On a social network, people are much more active in the mornings. On an e-commerce site, Black Friday causes many more users to come online for discount shopping. Our distributed application must be able to scale in response to these spikes in traffic. Cloud computing has changed the popular software architecture patterns, and load balancing has changed along with it. With on-demand, infinite infrastructure, we don’t need to worry about ordering servers and provisioning. With infrastructure as code, it becomes simpler to manage lots of deployable units–so we can break up our monolith into microservices, and have hundreds or thousands of virtual machines or containers running. Enterprises that were started before cloud computing have large on-premise server deployments–but today, many of them also use the cloud. The cloud can be used to augment their classic on-prem deployments with cloud platform-as-a-service features. The cloud can also be used as a reliable way to scale during high load events. Today, a common architectural pattern is to have your application broken up into services. Each of those services has multiple instances. When the load on a particular service is under lots of demand, you create more instances to handle the increased load. How do you monitor the load on each service? How do you know when to spin up new instances of the service? Load analysis and load balancing across different services can be implemented by placing “agents” throughout your infrastructure. These agents gather data about services and service instances, and route that data to a centralized place. The centralized “control plane” can be used to make decisions about load-balancing and traffic routing. Ranga Rajagopalan worked on networking at Cisco for a decade before co-founding Avi Networks as CTO. Avi Networks builds modern load balancing software, and in today’s episode, Ranga describes the requirements of load balancing. We talked about the evolution of network infrastructure, the impact of the cloud, and the technical decisions that his team has made when architecting Avi Networks. Full disclosure: Avi Networks is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Spring Framework gives developers an environment for building cloud native projects. On December 4th-7th, SpringOne Platform is coming to San Francisco. SpringOne Platform is a conference where developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the Spring ecosystem and beyond. Speakers at SpringOne Platform include Eric Brewer (who created the CAP theorem), Vaughn Vernon (who writes extensively about Domain Driven Design), and many thought leaders in the Spring Ecosystem. SpringOne Platform is the premier conference for those who build, deploy, and run cloud-native software. Software Engineering Daily listeners can sign up with the discount code SEDaily100 and receive $100 off of a Spring One Platform conference pass. I will also be at SpringOne reporting on developments in the cloud native ecosystem. Join me December 4th-7th at the SpringOne Platform conference, and use discount code SEDaily100 for $100 off your conference pass. You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily. Simplify continuous delivery with GoCD, the on-premise, open source, continuous delivery tool by ThoughtWorks. With GoCD, you can easily model complex deployment workflows using pipelines and visualize them end-to-end with the Value Stream Map. You get complete visibility into and control of your company’s deployments. At gocd.org/sedaily, find out how to bring continuous delivery to your teams. Say goodbye to deployment panic and hello to consistent, predictable deliveries. Visit gocd.org/sedaily to learn more about GoCD. Commercial support and enterprise add-ons, including disaster recovery, are available. Every second your cloud servers are running, they are costing you money. Stop paying for idle cloud instances and VMs. Control the cost of your cloud with ParkMyCloud. ParkMyCloud automatically turns off cloud resources when you don’t need them. Whether you are on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud, it’s easy to start saving money with ParkMyCloud. You sign up for ParkMyCloud, you connect to your cloud provider, and ParkMyCloud gives you a dashboard of all your resources–including their costs. From the dashboard, you can automatically schedule when your different cloud instances get turned on or off – saving you 65% or more. Additionally, you can manage databases, auto scaling groups and set up logical groups of servers to turn off during nights and weekends when you don’t need them–and you can see how much money you are saving. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily to get $100 in free credit for ParkMyCloud for SE Daily listeners. ParkMyCloud is used by McDonald’s, CapitalOne, and Fox, and saves customers tens of thousands of dollars every month. Go to parkmycloud.com/sedaily, and cut the cost of your cloud today.      
Oct. 26, 2017
It’s 9pm at night, and you are hungry. You order a pizza from Domino’s. You live on a street that’s dark, and so you have installed a smart lightbulb in front of your mailbox that lights up the address. When the pizza at Domino’s is ready, you want the lightbulb on your mailbox to light up so that the delivery person can read your address when they arrive in front of your house with the pizza. The Internet should make it possible to have this kind of event-driven, connected world. Anything that is connected to the Internet should be able to send signals to anything else on the Internet, so that our lives gradually become more automated. This is what IFTTT does. Users of IFTTT can easily create applets to wire different services together. You can use IFTTT to trigger an email whenever three of your friends retweet something on Twitter. You can use IFTTT to flash the lights in your house when Bitcoin hits new market highs. You can use IFTTT to order a pizza whenever Bitcoin crashes. IFTTT makes it easy to connect different services together, and a lot of work goes into the infrastructure that enables these billions of events to process correctly. Nicky Leach from IFTTT’s engineering team joins the show to describe how IFTTT allows for integrations between services that were not built to integrate–and he talks about the scheduling, data engineering, and monitoring of the company’s software stack. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors When your application is failing on a user’s device, how do you find out about it? Raygun lets you see every problem in your software and how to fix it. Raygun brings together crash reporting, real user monitoring, user tracking, and deployment tracking. See every error and crash affecting your users right now. Monitor your deployments, to make sure that a release is not impacting users in new ways. And track your users through your application to identify the bad experiences they are having. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun, and get a free 14 day trial to try out Raygun and find the errors that are occurring in your applications today. Raygun is used by Microsoft, Slack, and Unity to monitor their customer facing software. Go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/raygun and try it out for yourself. You want to work with Kubernetes but wish the process was simpler. The folks who brought you Kubernetes now want to make it easier to use. Heptio is a company by founders of the Kubernetes project, built to support and advance the open Kubernetes ecosystem. They build products, open source tools, and services that bring people closer to ‘upstream’ Kubernetes. Heptio offers instructor-led Kubernetes training, professional help from expert Kubernetes solutions engineers, as well as expert support of upstream Kubernetes configurations. Find out more at softwareengineeringdaily.com/heptio. Heptio is committed to making Kubernetes easier for all developers to use through their contributions to Kubernetes, Heptio open source projects, and other community efforts. Check out Heptio to make your life with Kubernetes easier at softwareengineeringdaily.com/heptio. You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.    
Oct. 23, 2017
Computer chips have physical limitations. When transistors get too small, electrons start to behave in ways that make the hardware modules less reliable. Our reliable technological progress has been enabled by Moore’s Law: the idea that the number of components we can fit on a chip doubles roughly every 12-18 months. We can’t keep shrinking the size of these components, because physics is no longer complying. Quantum computing allows us to operate on qubits rather than bits, giving us better parallelism and continued reliable technological progress. Quantum computing is still mostly an area of research rather than production systems–but it is rapidly approaching usability, and Zlatko Minev joins the show to explain how quantum computing works, and why software engineers should care. Zlatko is a PhD candidate at the Yale Quantum Information Lab. Today he describes how qubits work, which algorithms quantum computing impacts, and which parts of modern computer architecture will work on a quantum computer. We may have to throw out the Von Neumann architecture when it comes to quantum! Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Dice helps you accelerate your tech career. Whether you’re actively looking for a job or need insights to grow in your role, Dice has the resources you need. Dice’s mobile app is the fastest and easiest way to get ahead. Search thousands of tech jobs – from software engineering to UI/UX to product management. Discover your worth with Dice’s Salary Predictor based on your unique skill set. Uncover new opportunities with Dice’s new career pathing tool which can give you insights about the best types of roles to transition to – and the skills you’ll need to get there. Manage your tech career and download the Dice Careers app on Android or iOS today. So check out Dice and support Software Engineering Daily, go to Dice.com/sedaily. Thanks to Dice for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily. You are programming a new service for your users. Or, you are hacking on a side project. Whatever you are building, you need to send email. For sending email, developers use SendGrid. SendGrid is the API for email, trusted by developers. Send transactional emails through the SendGrid API. Build marketing campaigns with a beautiful interface for crafting the perfect email. SendGrid is used by Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify–but anybody can start for free and get 100 emails per day. Just go to SendGrid.com/sedaily to get started. Your email is important–make sure it gets delivered properly, with SendGrid, the most reliable email delivery service. Get started with 100 emails per day at SendGrid.com/sedaily. Incapsula can protect your API servers and microservices from responding to unwanted requests. To try Incapsula for yourself, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and get a free enterprise trial of Incapsula. Incapsula’s API gives you control over the security and performance of your application–whether you have a complex microservices architecture or a WordPress site, like Software Engineering Daily. Incapsula has a global network of over 30 data centers that optimize routing and cache your content. The same network of data centers that are filtering your content for attackers are operating as a CDN, and speeding up your application. To try Incapsula today, go to incapsula.com/2017podcasts and check it out. Thanks again, Incapsula. Thanks to Symphono for sponsoring Software Engineering Daily. Symphono is a custom engineering shop where senior engineers tackle big tech challenges while learning from each other. Check it out at symphono.com/sedaily. Thanks to Symphono for being a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily for almost a year now. Your continued support allows us to deliver content to the listeners on a regular basis.    
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