Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law & Policy Clinic (TLPC)

Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law & Policy Clinic (TLPC)
By Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law & Policy Clinic (TLPC)
About this podcast
Student-run public interest technology law and policy advocacy at Colorado Law.
In this podcast

Podcasts like "Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law & Policy Clinic (TLPC)"   ·   View all

By Bennet Kelley on WebmasterRadio.fm
By Nixon Peabody LLP
By Walter Haverfield LLP: Miriam and Lisa
By Avocados at Law
Latest episodes
Feb. 16, 2018
In today’s episode, we talk about what the Waymo and Uber settlement says about the future of self-driving cars and the lasting impact of John Perry Barlow’s view of internet governance. Andrew Hawkins, The Waymo v. Uber trial has shaken my confidence in self-driving cars John Perry Barlow, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace April Glaser, The Incomplete Vision of John Perry Barlow Adam Thierer, Soft Law for Hard Problems: The Governance of Emerging Technologies in an Uncertain Future Follow the hosts Andrew and Blake, and stay up to date with the latest CU TLPC happenings. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Feb. 2, 2018
Andrew and Blake talk about the most recent state efforts to enforce net neutrality regulations after the FCC voted to reclassify broadband last month. Follow the hosts Andrew and Blake, and stay up to date with the latest CU TLPC happenings. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Jan. 19, 2018
Robyn Greene from the Open Technology Institute at New America joins Andrew Manley and Blake Reid to discuss the recent passage of the FISA Section 702 re-authorization. Read Robyn’s work here, and follow her on Twitter @Robyn_Greene for the latest FISA and government surveillance updates. Follow the hosts Andrew and Blake, and stay up to date with the latest CU TLPC happenings. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
June 27, 2017
Student attorney Andrew Manley speaks with former FCC Commissioner Kathleen Abernathy, currently of Wilkinson Barker Knauer.  Topics include expanding broadband access to rural communities, the challenges that come with being a small telecom provider, and international cooperation in the areas of spectrum and satellites. Commissioner Abernathy spoke on the Institutional Side of Information Policy Panel at the 2017 Digitial Broadband Migration conference hosted by the Silicon Flatirons Center. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
May 22, 2017
Student attorney Andrew Manley speaks with Mike Gallagher of the Entertainment Software Association.  Topics include challenges facing the video game industry as technology and delivery mechanisms evolve, and how the industry is adapting to handle those challenges. Mike spoke on the Understanding Core Regulatory Goals in Context Panel at the 2017 Digitial Broadband Migration conference hosted by the Silicon Flatirons Center; you can watch the panel here. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
April 4, 2017
  Student attorney Andrew Manley kicks off Season 4 of the TLPC Podcast with a conversation with Matt Larsen, owner and CEO of Vistabeam. Topics include increasing access to broadband in rural areas, and the changing nature of the Internet itself. Matt spoke on the Changing Technological Landscape Panel at the 2017 Digitial Broadband Migration conference hosted by the Silicon Flatirons Center; you can watch the panel here. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
Jan. 17, 2017
On today’s episode, student attorney Andrew Manley speaks with the Lorrie Cranor, Chief Technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Topics include protecting user privacy online, getting more young girls interested in science and technology, and of course Lorrie’s famous bad password dress. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
Dec. 6, 2016
On today’s episode, Silicon Flatirons senior fellow Pierre De Vries joins student attorney Andrew Manley for a conversation about spectrum management, how usage of spectrum can be improved, and the value of interdisciplinary education. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Transcript [Editor’s note: we’re starting to experiment with transcripts for accessibility, searchability, and other reasons—but obviously have a ways to go. Please give us feedback on ways to improve the presentation!] [Music] [00:00:17] Andrew: Hey, folks. Andrew Manley back again with another episode of the Samuelson-Glushko Tech Law & Policy Clinic Podcast. For today’s episode, I spoke with Pierre de Vries, a senior fellow here at CU’s own Silicon Flatirons Center. Our conversation today revolves mainly around how we use and manage radio spectrum, focusing on the different schools of thought when it comes to spectrum management, and how we can manage it better as times change and technology advances. As I think you’ll hear in the interview, Pierre is a multi-disciplined specialist and he’s really good at being able to thoughtfully and clearly explain hard engineering concepts in ways that they’re digestible for us non-engineers. The interview is a little longer than some of our others, but I’m really glad Pierre took the time, because there’s a lot of good stuff in there. Thanks so much for tuning in. Enjoy the show. [00:01:07] Pierre, thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me today. To get started, how did you come to be involved with the Silicon Flatirons Center? [00:01:19] Pierre: It’s quite a strange story. I didn’t realize until quite recently, in fact, how the connection happened, because I just got a call out of the blue one day from Phil Weiser. But quite recently, I was chatting to Brad Bernthal, Professor Bernthal, and I learned that it was because of a paper I gave at a conference in Dublin in 2007. It was a paper about metaphors in spectrum policy and the fact that people who do spectrum policy seem to be fixated on [00:02:00] the metaphor that spectrum is like real estate; that there are, in fact, other ways to think about spectrum than just real estate; and that thinking about real estate is not necessarily always a good idea. It turns out that Brad enjoyed the talk. Actually, I met him there. We chatted afterwards, and I enjoyed talking to him, and he must have spoken to Prof. Weiser. One thing led to another, and so I’ve been associated with Flatirons for going on ten years now. [00:02:33] Andrew: So, you mentioned that there is this idea that spectrum is, like…it’s a metaphor for property rights, or that you could regulate it as analogous to property rights. What are the problems with taking that approach? Why is that ineffective? [00:02:48] Pierre: Every metaphor has strengths and weaknesses, because a metaphor is just a model. It says, “This thing is mostly like this other thing.” The problem with the “spectrum is real estate” metaphor is it makes a bunch of assumptions—for example, that spectrum is a thing, like a piece of land. And it leads to what I believe are really futile and fruitless arguments about this “resource,” which we now assume spectrum is. How do we manage it? How do we parcel it out? And the kind of arguments you get into is, Well, if spectrum is like land, should we treat it like a common
Nov. 22, 2016
On today’s episode, Professor Paul Ohm of Georgetown Law joins student attorney Andrew Manley for a conversation about policy making, privacy, and how to not win your fantasy league using Python. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening Theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
Nov. 7, 2016
On today’s episode, 2L Andrew Manley talks to Bryan Tramont of Wilkinson Barker Knauer. Topics include the role of media and agencies in an increasingly political climate, writing statutes for constantly evolving industries, and the FCC’s incentive auction. Music of the show is provided by Gino and the Goons: Opening Theme: Troubles Sign off music: On My Way Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.