Double Your Freelancing Podcast

Double Your Freelancing Podcast
By Brennan Dunn
About this podcast
Better Clients. More Money. A Happier Life.
Latest episodes
Feb. 22, 2018
Will guest appearances on podcasts benefit your consulting business? Is it worth it to start your own podcast even if your audience is limited? Matt Inglot thinks it is! In this episode of DYF Podcast, Brennan talks to 2016 DYFConf speaker, Matt Inglot, about using podcasting to get consulting clients and expand your audience. When Matt started his podcast, Freelance Transformation, he didn’t expect it to have any effect on his web-development agency. More than 145 episodes later, he has found that the impacts have been manifold. Not only has his podcast become one of the most prominent in the freelancing community, but it also helped him develop his contacts and directly led to a $60,000 gig. Other benefits have been less obvious but just as empowering, and Matt has learned all of the right and wrong ways to podcast along the way. Key Takeaways: How to determine if podcasting is right for you How to book your first few guests How to build your listenership How to use podcasts to build your authority What tools and setup do you need to get started For the past 12 years Matt has run his agency, Tilted Pixel, with great success. He says that as a micro-agency he has been able to create a stable business and the life he was looking for without the 80 hour work-week one might typically expect. His newer venture is Freelance Transformation, his podcast, which launched in April 2015. Matt says Freelance Transformation initially had nothing to do with his consulting business --if it had, he pointed out, he would have built the podcast around the interests of potential clients. Instead, Freelance Transformation sprang out of Matt’s desire to spread the knowledge he’d acquired through his years of experience. He was also keen to get in and start a new online business after consulting on so many through the years. To his surprise, even though they weren’t directly related, Matt’s podcast brought a boost in his agency’s sales --including a $60,000 deal that came as a result of one recording. Freelance Transformation’s success (it hit 100,000 downloads within the first year and has now nearly tripled that) has allowed Matt to grow his existing agency while also seeing where the new venture takes him --and the first place it took him was MicroConf. Podcasting to Meet People The first lesson Matt says he learned while building Freelance Transformation is that, “podcasting is a great networking hack.” As he began looking for guests, Matt attended Microconf and found that right from the beginning, being able to say “Hi I’m Matt, I’m the host of Freelance Transformation,” is more of a conversation starter than “Hi, I’m Matt, I do web-design.” That year, Matt took his portable mic around the conference, recording some of his earliest stuff (including an episode with Brennan) and growing his experience --learning among other things, that recording in a noisy Vegas hotel during a conference is not ideal. Matt says that from that conference alone, he was able to develop a reputation among freelancers and find guests for his first 20 or so episodes. If you are considering podcasting, Matt recommends making these in-person connections and using events to start meaningful dialogues with potential guests. Matt found that having guest spots to offer on his podcast, opens doors to people who might have seemed off limits before. For Matt this included Brennan, Michael Port, Alan Weiss, Charlie Hoehn, and outside the consulting world, luxury concierge, Steve Sims. The podcast allowed him to have in-depth conversations with these giants and to stay in touch with them afterwards. As the rapport built, Matt’s guests started making suggestions and introductions of people who could either help Matt or be helped by him. Matt’s contact list snowballed, he says, and “next thing you know this inaccessible community is now accessible.” Do You Need An Audience? With these benefits alone, and even without an established audience, starting a podcast already has some advantages. Matt estimates that Freelance Transformation has added 10,000-15,000 new visitors to his site each month, but he has noticed that his increased business isn’t necessarily from people listening to his podcast. Rather, he believes most of these referrals to his site have come from the other professionals he has meet through hosting the podcast. So do listeners even matter? Of course they do. For Matt, a key motivator was being able to pass on wisdom and help develop the next generation of freelancers. But another clear advantage to having a large audience is that the further your reach, the more pull you’ll have for getting the guests you want on your show. Having a network, Brennan points out, also makes launching a new product easier. He says launching his newest product, RightMessage , was much simpler with an established audience and an unobtrusive way to get updates to his followers. His audience is often interested in seeing behind the scenes as his products develop so Brennan keeps them informed of every step along the way. Since Brennan is committed to providing useful examples of how to build and launch products, this audience relationship represents another win-win scenario that can come from podcasting. So how do you build your listenership? If you’re like Matt, and you’re not a born social media self-promoter, he recommends the following 3 step approach when launching a new podcast: Reach out to everyone you know and ask them to check out your new podcast and leave a review. While you probably won’t get long-term listeners from this exercise, the initial flood of downloads tells iTunes to pay attention. Chose guests strategically. Matt looked for guests who were consulting-oriented, and who had a great audience that he could borrow. When the guest sends out his/her social media blast you could be getting an extra hundred or thousand new eyes looking your way. Use events to build relationships with potential guests in your field. Conferences are expensive, including tickets, travel, accommodations and time away from normal operations. Finding new listeners with fliers and quick blurbs costs a lot in effort with minimal results. Instead, your mission should be to invest in face to face personal interactions at common-goal events. This can lead to guests who care about the success of the program --it can be the difference between a guest tweeting that they were on and them actually promoting you. Some of Matt’s Microconf contacts were even willing to give him their email lists! Positioning Podcasting is also a great way to position yourself in the freelance world. Brennan uses his guests’ networks to expand his own sphere of influence. He does some digging to learn who in his guest’s network he’d like to work with and seeks introductions via the mutual connection. For example, he might look at Matt’s previous Freelance Transformation guests, see who else has a podcast, select a couple, and if appropriate, he’ll message them saying, “Hey, I talked to our mutual friend, Matt Inglot, earlier this year. He suggested that I might be a good fit for your podcast.” Frequent wide-spread appearances on podcasts can build your credibility as an expert within your field. Brennan highlights wearables developer and former DYF Academy student, Justin Bergen, as the master here. While developing products, Justin hosted industry leaders on his podcast, giving them a spotlight and simultaneously shoring up a his new relationship with the guest. By asking the guests “do you know of anyone else in the industry who would be a good guest for my podcast?” he also expanded his contacts. Since the wearables niche is fairly small, he was able to make key introductions and establish himself as an expert in the wearables niche. This brings Matt to the point that Podcasting is also a comparatively simple way to publish within your field. “Rather than researching, writing, editing, rewriting, publishing and distributing a guest post or a whole book,” he says, “you can cut to the chase with twelve bullet points and a good microphone.” Matt points out that even after writing, editing and revising a book or even a much shorter guest post, you still have to find a way to publish/distribute it, but appearing on podcasts, is a lower-key ways of establishing your authority. After guesting on other podcasts enough times, you will start to notice that you have built your own audience. Telling Your Story A simple, subtle benefit to being a frequent podcast guest, is discovering the best way to articulate your message. Telling your story becomes easier each time you tell it: you’ll find your glossary becomes refined, your clarity improves, and your confidence builds. Matt mentions Jeremy Weiss from Mixergy who says of his podcast that even if no one were listening, the exercise would still be worth doing, and he would continue to run it. Of course this ties in to what we’ve said before since having your own podcast is a great gateway to appearing on other people’s. If you have your own podcast, other hosts know that you know what you’re doing, have the right equipment, and will deliver the audio they’re looking for. Your Guests are Your Research and Case Studies One easily overlooked benefit to hosting a podcast is the research value of discussing best practices with others in your field. Freelance Start, Matt’s course on freelancing was borne out of the 145+ episodes of the podcast. These serve as ”almost scientific data set” that he can referenced and have more information than if he were only citing his own experiences. One example of a discovery Matt made through his conversations, is that when he talked to people who were struggling to find clients, there was a correlation with how much time they spent on marketing. That is, Matt now has the numbers showing that the more effort one spends on marketing, the more clients their business will likely have. Similarly, Brennan’s aim in starting his new Right Message podcast was to talk with people who have DIYed or used other non Right Message tools to achieve personalized marketing. Hearing why they got into it and what they did wrong, Brennan expects to gain market research. Is podcasting right for you? Before starting out with your new podcast, Matt wants you to ask yourself what you hope to achieve. Having a podcast won’t get you new clients overnight and Matt warns that there are easier ways to create content if that is your only goal. So he urges you to have a strategy and a reason to do it. Things he suggests you think about when considering starting a podcast: Are there specific people you want to connect with? Are you focused on relationship building, and if so, with whom? Are you articulating ideas/thoughts clearly? (If yes, this helps you get on other people’s podcasts and to be great at it). What are some of the cons to consider? It is time consuming. Matt says when he started Freelancer Transformation, each episode took 10 hours to make from researching guests to editing and publishing. Now he has standard processes, he hires a company to produce the show, and he has a nice network through which he can easily find guests. None of that was established in the beginning so starting out, you need to recognize that it will take time. Another con is that it is not the greatest way to generate fast traffic to your site. If you are looking to generate a lot of traffic to your site quickly, you should focus on guesting (writing guest posts and appearing on other peoples’ podcast) to build that audience faster. Having your own podcast connects you with the specific people you want to connect with fast, but doesn’t help you reach the masses as much as one might think. Quick tips If you’ve read all of this and are ready to get your podcast underway, Matt has a few suggestions for you to check out. He recommends Pat Flynn’s free podcasting guide, and Jon Lee Dumas’ Podcaster's Paradise. Philip Morgan has a free article on all of the podcasting equipment he uses. Matt says to stay on the beaten path when starting your podcast and not to get too fancy or overthink things. For a microphone he suggests: ATR 2100 or the Yeti --they’re professional sounding, under $100 and you don’t have to dwell on the question longer than necessary. Matt says that if he were starting over, he would choose a simpler format since currently his shows involve pre intro, intro music, an introduction, the interview, outro, and outro music. If he were to redesign the whole thing, he says he would do everything live. He’d bring the guest on, introduce them, play the intro music and get down to it. By doing everything live, he would have saved hours of editing. Though it is tempting to want to innovate, he says to get the basics down and don’t overcomplicate things. Listeners are there for the expert content and don’t care about a spiffy sounding intro by a third party. One area where Matt says he made the right call was by not posting video as part of his podcast. He refrained from this primarily because video complicated things, but it is a waste of resources for ROI. If you are considering hosting video also, bear in mind that Matt says it won’t do great on youtube by itself. Clips, however, can be used on social media and to spark interest in your regular programing. In the end, hosting a podcast will not bring a flood of sales and traffic to your site. However, it can be a great gateway to the people in your field who seem off limits. It can help you refine your message and reinforce your authority. It can even give you the data you need in order to improve your products and services. Take it from expert, Matt, podcasting is an exercise worth engaging in, as long as you pay attention to the “whys” and set yourself up for success. For further reading, check out the links below: http://www.microconf.com/ https://freelancetransformation.com/ https://rightmessage.com/ Pat Flynn's Podcasting Tutorial Podcaster's Paradise Philip Morgan on Podcasting Justin Bergen Wearables
July 13, 2017
Where has Brennan been all this time (it's been 6 months!)? And what's next for the Double Your Freelancing podcast?
Dec. 12, 2016
My guest today is Kelsey Kreiling, co-founder of Presence Agency and creator of Week of the Website, a productized website design business. Kelsey is a designer and website builder who has grown multiple businesses from the ground up. Her newest business, Week of the Website, builds amazing websites for their customers in only five days. On today’s episode we discuss her experience transitioning from client work to a productized service business model. Today’s topics include: Getting started in productized services, Focusing clients for success with clear communication, Using set processes to streamline service products, Building referral channels and recurring revenue, Opportunities for productized services in your own business Resources and links: Double Your Freelancing Academy Week of the Website Week of the Website - Website planning tool Presence Agency Kelsey Kreiling - Website Kelsey Kreiling - LinkedIn Kelsey Kreiling - Twitter FreshBooks Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Double Your Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends
Nov. 28, 2016
Today I’m talking with Joanna Wiebe, the founder of CopyHackers.com. CopyHackers is an online resource for everything you need to know about copywriting, including many informative case studies. Her new project, Airstory, is a fantastic content production tool for high-performance writing teams. Joanna taught me how to write effective sales copy and on today’s episode we discuss her Rule of One: how you can make sure that when you do write, your writing is focused on talking to one customer archetype. Today’s topics include: The Rule of One: 4-part definition and implementation, Niched marketing and personalized customer experience, Creating a reader archetype, Stages of customer awareness: problem, solution and product, Big ideas and your promise to the customer, Analyzing your offer to find missing details, Questioning common “best practices” Resources and links: Double Your Freelancing Academy Drip Email Marketing Automation - Double Your Freelancing Course CopyHackers.com Airstory Joanna Wiebe - Google+ Joanna Wiebe - Twitter Joanna Wiebe - LinkedIn FreshBooks Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Double Your Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends
Oct. 17, 2016
My guest today is Meryl Johnston, founder of the international accounting agency Bean Ninjas. She has a background in accounting and began her first business as a consultant. She has grown her current business from the ground up and is now generating over $100,000 in recurring revenue through monthly productized bookkeeping services. We discuss her career, how she transitioned to a productized service business and lessons learned along the way. Today’s topics include: Transition from consulting to productized services Launching in seven days and growing the business through referrals Developing product offerings and pricing strategy Lessons learned since launch: hiring, customer niches Aligning marketing to customer niche Sales processes for productized services versus consulting Value of informational sales calls Resources and links: Bean Ninjas Dan Norris - 7 Day Startup Trello Project Management You Need a Budget Double Your Freelancing Meetup Groups Double Your Freelancing Academy FreshBooks Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Double Your Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends Hopefully the fact that your show of support will keep the podcast going is reward enough for you. But we want to sweeten the deal for you even further: After you’ve published your review, send an email to kai@doubleyourfreelancing.com. You’ll get an exclusive video from Double Your Freelancing Conference — James Clear's talk on Developing Better Work Habits — absolutely free. Click here to make it happen!
Sept. 19, 2016
Today I’m talking with Barry O’Kane on niching down and creating a location independent business. He’s a Double Your Freelancing Academy student who has been working with Philip Morgan for the past few months while living in Edinburgh, Scotland and running his online business: Happy Porch. Barry has over 15 years experience in the web development industry and became location independent four years ago. Today’s topics include: Double Your Freelancing new drip email marketing automation course The importance of using Mastermind groups to improve focus in your business Mastermind group structure, leadership and relationships Running a distributed team using structured communication processes Recent evolution of Double Your Freelancing Academy How Barry founded his company Happy Porch Resources and links: Drip Email Marketing Automation - Double Your Freelancing Course Double Your Freelancing Academy Happy Porch Endzone Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Double Your Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends Here is what one loyal listener had to say about the Double Your Freelancing podcast: After you’ve published your review, send an email to kai@doubleyourfreelancing.com. You’ll get an exclusive video from Double Your Freelancing Conference — James Clear's talk on Developing Better Work Habits — absolutely free. Click here to make it happen!
Sept. 12, 2016
My guest today is Todd Tresidder, a former hedge fund manager and founder of FinancialMentor.com. He is a personal finance and investing expert coach who teaches how to grow wealth and reach financial independence. He emphasizes the importance of personal development and fulfillment in attaining the goal of financial freedom. A self-made millionaire himself, Todd’s FinancialMentor.com programs provide a step-by-step blueprint for building wealth. Visit Todd at FinancialMentor.com for free resources, courses, financial coaching and advice. Today’s topics include: Conceptualizing the importance of retirement and making it a priority The journey to financial freedom as a freelancer Controlling expenses is important, but increasing your income is less limited Adding value to yourself by being a revenue increaser, not an expense to your client The goal is not just to be rich but to experience fulfillment and happiness The Rule of 300/400: For every $1000/month you spend it takes $300,000-$400,000 dollars in assets to support that The three classes of assets: business entrepreneurship, real estate, and stocks/bond/mutual funds Building passive assets as revenue streams Growing equity slowly instead of “getting rich quick” Formula for wealth: Make more than you spend, and invest the difference wisely People will pay for one thing, which is a solution to their problem. Formula for business: traffic x conversions = profit Resources and links: FinancialMentor.com How to Design Your Life to Create Financial Independence 52 Weeks to Financial Freedom Twitter @financialmentor Double Your Freelancing Rate Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Double Your Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends Here is what one loyal listener had to say about the Double Your Freelancing podcast: After you’ve published your review, send an email to kai@doubleyourfreelancing.com. You’ll get an exclusive video from Double Your Freelancing Conference — James Clear's talk on Developing Better Work Habits — absolutely free. Click here to make it happen!
Sept. 7, 2016
Today I’m talking with Michael Port, author of Book Yourself Solid and four other bestselling books. I came across Book Yourself Solid at a bookstore when I first started freelancing, and loved the online marketing techniques he describes. He has been running Book Yourself Solid programs around the world and training freelancers for the past 14 years. Michael describes six core self-promotion strategies that freelancers use, and more importantly goes into the backend of how to close sales and actually book business. He is a networking and direct outreach expert that has a daily routine to open doors and bring in clients. Even as an introvert, he has used public speaking, teaching and networking to create an international brand. Today’s topics include: Freelancers need to design a marketing and self-promotion system for their business. Building credibility, pricing yourself right and being able to have simple sales conversations are more important than self-promotion strategies alone. Marketing doesn’t get you clients, it gets you awareness; what you do once you have that awareness is what gets you the business. There are 6 core self-promotion strategies: networking, direct outreach, referral, writing, public speaking, and web strategies; some of these are mandatory and some are not. Networking is developing deeper relationships with people you already know. Technology tactics might change, but the core strategies remain as the big picture. Don’t focus your energies on every platform out there and spread yourself too thin - it is overwhelming and distracting. Make sales offers that are proportionate to the amount of trust you’ve earned. Decide which self-promotion strategy will work for your ideal client. To get booked solid you only need a network of 90 people. You can add value to your network by regularly introducing people to contacts and information relevant to them. Helping others by reaching out to them is a more comfortable form of self-promotion than just trying to help yourself. Networking as an introvert can be made easier by connecting others and delivering on your promises. Resources and links: Michael Port Website Book Yourself Solid Book Yourself Solid on Amazon Twitter @michaelport Facebook @michaelport Contactually + Book Yourself Solid Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Business of Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes. Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends.
June 27, 2016
Today my guest is Jonathan Raymond the former CEO of E-Myth, he became the CEO in 2011 when the owner wanted to modernize the brand. He decided to break out on his own in 2015. The idea behind the E-Myth is that running a business is different than being great at whatever the business does. An example would be a great dancer who opens a dance studio and discovers there is more to running a dance studio than being a fantastic dancer. Jonathan now focuses on what it takes to create a great business and the culture, scale and team involved with doing so. He now focuses on refound.com and the core principles required to be a great leader and business owner. Jonathan has a new approach to leading and managing teams. He is also the author of the upcoming book, “Good Authority”. When it comes to managing teams, we not only need a new set of skills, we have to reimagine who we are and Jonathan and his business help leaders to be the best they can be. Enjoy! Today’s topics include: As an entrepreneur there is still culture and team building and interpersonal dynamics that need to be dealt with It also comes down to referrals, so good relationships are important People make referrals in relationships Going into a relationship with a freelancer, you want to be able to refer them to others because of the great job they did We want freelancers who do their job and don’t need to be micromanaged, we also want to refer responsible people because it is a reflection on us People overestimate the big stuff, but the small stuff is important, like email response time Be the type of person people want to do business with, no BS around communication If you mess something up take responsibility and not only apologize, but say what happened and take ownership We have a pretty good sense of which clients are happy, reach out and restore amicability People don’t like confrontation and bury stuff, but then it stacks up Understand who your ideal customer is, challenge assumptions that the client has, the client is in their own bubble, coach and mentor them Fill the gap with challenge and communication Scarcity can prevent you from pushing the envelope, yet it is counter intuitive to not take the risky road Some clients aren't’ the clients you want to work with anyway Actually, have requirements and screen clients so that you are not stuck with an unresponsive hard to communicate with client The fear that it turns off clients is unfounded, people want to buy a process, so having a set plan to deliver will set you apart from the competition Set expectations from onboarding to deliverables Build accountability into the process Your time is valuable It comes down to the way you see yourself and your value, at some point being superman is not sustainable, hold space and create context for change Be Yoda not superman, self value and self worth Fixer, fighter or friend - 3 styles of taking on superman role Good Authority is Jonathan’s new book coming out Mentoring your own clients - Small business owners don’t have anyone to question them People at the top are in a bubble and they don’t see what they don’t see You can add value by mentoring and asking questions and building a personal relationship What is the purpose? What is the result? Find the why, you will have a happier client and deliver a better product and maybe make a friend on a way. To get the right website figure out why they are doing what they are doing. “Mentoring means questioning the assumptions they don’t realize that they are making” Jonathan Raymond Imposter Syndrome - Roadblock of it not being my job and self doubt coming up. Take a small risk and you will be amazed how people will open up Resources and links: Refound Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Business of Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends Hopefully the fact that your show of support will keep the podcast going is reward enough for you. But we want to sweeten the deal for you even further: After you’ve published your review, send an email to kai@doubleyourfreelancing.com. You’ll get an exclusive video from Double Your Freelancing Conference — James Clear's talk on Developing Better Work Habits — absolutely free. Click here to make it happen!
June 20, 2016
I’m super excited to share today’s interview with Ryan Waggoner with you. Ryan has an amazing consulting business and is pushing more than a million a year in profit. Ryan is killing it with mobile consulting, where a lot of people in that space struggle to make $100,000 plus. Ryan is an all around sharp guy, but I’m specifically bringing him on because he is really good at cash flow management. He has a great perspective on splitting up personal and business finance, and I want to capture that story. Ryan has been freelancing for 10 years. He started with website development and now he helps startups build mobile apps and know what not to build. Because there is a 6 to 8 week lead time in Ryan’s business, he always focuses on doing business development to avoid those feast or famine times when there is no work or too much work. He has a background process where there is always some form of business development going on. Today’s topics include: The emotions and behaviors of business and personal finance are intertwined Budgeting to pay yourself a stable amount every month no matter what you bring in Having a monthly buffer, depending on how long the lead time for projects are and where your monthly budget falls Getting recurring revenue can also help buffer the situation and put you into a good psychological place Getting very disciplined about budgeting, getting out of debt, and saving an emergency fund, can make life less stressful and make business decisions easier Even if your monthly recurring doesn’t cover all of your expenses, it helps relieve the stress and make covering the expenses easier Ryan and his wife both freelance Once they started making money and getting a bit ahead, they started putting money in IRAs on a monthly basis Treating your savings like a bill and having a tax strategy and a solo 401K is a good idea Successful freelancers should take advantage of some of the amazing tax advantages we have Automatic payments and savings as much as possible Big fan of “I Will Teach You To Be Rich” Have a backbone of recurring income and be smart and don’t burn through all of your money on a good month, save if you can When your income isn’t enough, do whatever you can to cut expenses and save a buffer, Having 3 to 6 months in the bank help you make an investment in yourself and fire bad clients It’s hugely freeing to take big chances on yourself Being desperate for money can lead to bad decisions Billions on Showtime - money that allows you to tell people I don’t need your business Often, what holds entrepreneurs back from making big business decisions and taking big leaps is not having enough money to feel secure The truth is my Ryans income became higher because he got his personal finances together - the psychological space to treat his business like a business Dumb business decisions tie back to fear related to money Ryan has a hustling mentality and he is good at sales, people good at sales can get in trouble by spending too much, because they assume they can make more This strategy works until it doesn’t Resources and links: Ryan’s Website Twitter @RyanWaggoner I Will Teach You To Be Rich Let’s Make Apps.io Firstmillionisthehardest.com Like the Podcast? Help us! If you enjoy the Business of Freelancing podcast, support us to keep it going! Subscribe on iTunes Leave us a 5-star review on iTunes Share the podcast with your friends Hopefully the fact that your show of support will keep the podcast going is reward enough for you. But we want to sweeten the deal for you even further: After you’ve published your review, send an email to kai@doubleyourfreelancing.com. You’ll get an exclusive video from Double Your Freelancing Conference — James Clear's talk on Developing Better Work Habits — absolutely free. Click here to make it happen!