Software Engineering Daily

By Software Engineering Daily

About this podcast   English    United States

Technical interviews about software topics.
May 19, 2018
Data Skeptic is a podcast about machine learning, data science, and how software affects our lives. The first guest on today’s episode is Kyle Polich, the host of Data Skeptic. Kyle is one of the best explainers of machine learning concepts I have met, and for this episode, he presented some material that is perfect for this audience: machine learning for software engineers. Second Spectrum is a company that analyzes data from professional sports, turning that data into visualizations, reports, and futuristic sports viewing experiences. We had a previous show about Second Spectrum where we went into the company in detail–it was an excellent show, so I wanted to have Kevin Squire, an engineer from Spectrum, come on the show to talk about how the company builds machine learning tools to analyze sports data. If you have not seen any of the visualizations from Second Spectrum, stop what you are doing and watch a video on it! This year we have had three Software Engineering Daily Meetups: in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. At each of these Meetups, listeners from the SE Daily community got to meet each other and talk about software–what they are building and what they are excited about. I was happy to be in attendance at each of these, and I am posting the talks given by our presenters. The audio quality is not perfect on these, but there are also no ads. Thanks to Telesign for graciously providing a space and some delicious food for our Meetup. Telesign has beautiful offices in Los Angeles, and they make SMS, voice, and data solutions. If you are looking for secure and reliable communications APIs, check them out. We’d love to have you as part of our community. We will have more Meetups eventually, and you can be notified of these by signing up for our newsletter. Come to SoftwareDaily.com and get involved with the discussion of episodes and software projects. You can also check out our open source projects–the mobile apps, and our website.
May 18, 2018
Voice interfaces are a newer form of communicating with computers. Alexa is a voice interface platform from Amazon. Alexa powers the Amazon Echo, as well as Alexa-enabled cars, refrigerators, and dishwashers. Any developer can build a device with a voice interface using a Raspberry Pi. Paul Cutsinger works on Echo and Alexa at Amazon. He’s focused on growing the market of developers who are building voice interfaces. In this episode, Paul describes how to design and implement a voice application for the Amazon Alexa platform. The market for voice powered apps is so new, and there has yet to be a “killer app.” If you like to tinker on new platforms, you will like this episode–and I was surprised by how easy it sounds to build a voice app. Personally I use voice interfaces all the time–to set timers, to find out how to tell if a cucumber has gone bad, to ask what temperature to cook a potato at. Sometimes, when I am lying in bed trying to get to sleep, I will ask my nearest device to read me a Wikipedia article. These are great use cases, but I’m sure we will see something much more groundbreaking in the future. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Triplebyte is a company that connects engineers with top tech companies. We’re running an experiment and our hypothesis is that Software Engineering Daily listeners will do well above average on the quiz. Go to triplebyte.com/sedaily and take the multiple-choice quiz, and in a few episodes we’ll share some stats about how you all did. Try it yourself at triplebyte.com/sedaily. Octopus Deploy is a friendly deployment automation tool, taking over where your build/CI server ends. Use Octopus to promote releases on-prem or to the cloud. Octopus integrates with your existing build pipeline–TFS and VSTS, Bamboo, TeamCity, and Jenkins. It integrates with AWS, Azure, and on-prem environments. Reliably and repeatedly deploy your .NET and Java apps and more. If you can package it, Octopus can deploy it! It’s quick and easy to install. Go to Octopus.com to trial Octopus free for 45 days. That’s Octopus.com Segment allows us to gather customer data from anywhere and send that data to any analytics tool. Segment is the customer data infrastructure that has saved us from writing duplicate code across all of the different platforms that we want to analyze. And if you’re using cloud apps such as – Mailchimp, Marketo, Intercom, AppNexus, Zendesk–you can integrate with all of these different tools and centralize your customer data in one place–with Segment. To get a free 90-day trial, signup for Segment at segment.com and enter SEDaily in the “How did you hear about us box?” during signup. GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.
May 17, 2018
Message broker systems decouple the consumers and producers of a message channel. In previous shows, we have explored ZeroMQ, PubNub, Apache Kafka, and NATS. In this episode, we talk about another message broker: Apache Pulsar. Pulsar is an open source distributed pub-sub message system originally created at Yahoo. It was used to scale products with high volumes of users–such as Yahoo Mail. There are three components of a Pulsar deployment: the Pulsar broker (which handles the message brokering), Apache Bookkeeper (which handles the durable storage of the messages), and Apache Zookeeper, which manages the distributed coordination. Lewis Kaneshiro joins the show to describe how Apache Pulsar works, and how it compares to other messaging systems like Apache Kafka. Lewis is the CEO of Streamlio, a company that builds messaging and stream processing systems for enterprises, and uses Pulsar in its core product. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Segment allows us to gather customer data from anywhere and send that data to any analytics tool. Segment is the customer data infrastructure that has saved us from writing duplicate code across all of the different platforms that we want to analyze. And if you’re using cloud apps such as – Mailchimp, Marketo, Intercom, AppNexus, Zendesk–you can integrate with all of these different tools and centralize your customer data in one place–with Segment. To get a free 90-day trial, signup for Segment at segment.com and enter SEDaily in the “How did you hear about us box?” during signup. The GCP Podcast covers the technologies that Google Cloud is building–through interviews with the people building them. And these are often unique, Google cloud services–like BigQuery, AutoML, and Firebase. So if you want to stay on the leading edge of what is being released at Google, and how these new technologies are built, check out gcppodcast.com. I’ve been a listener for a few years now, and the content is consistently good–a few of my favorite recent episodes are the interview with Vint Cerf and the show about BigQuery. You can find those episodes and more by going to gcppodcast.com. Sumo Logic is a cloud-native, machine data analytics service that helps you Run and Secure your Modern Application. If you are feeling the pain of managing your own log, event, and performance metrics data, check out sumologic.com/sedaily. Even if you have tools already, it’s worth checking out Sumo Logic and seeing if you can leverage your data even more effectively, with real-time dashboards and monitoring, and improved observability – to improve the uptime of your application and keep your day-to-day runtime more secure. Check out sumologic.com/sedaily for a free 30-day Trial of Sumo Logic, to find out how Sumo Logic can improve your productivity and your application observability–wherever you run your applications. GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.
May 16, 2018
Gloo is a function gateway built on top of the popular open source project Envoy. The goal of Gloo is to decouple client-facing APIs from upstream APIs. Gloo is similar to an API gateway, which is a tool that software companies can use to collect all their APIs and one place and impose security, monitoring, and other standards around those APIs. The goal of Gloo is to provide all the tools necessary to glue together traditional and cloud-native applications. Idit Levine is the CEO of Solo.io, a company that is building Gloo and several other projects. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily. GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily. Every team has its own software, and every team has specific questions about that internal software stack. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure home for your team’s questions and answers. No more digging through stale wikis and lost emails—give your team back the time it needs to build better products. Your engineering team already knows and loves Stack Overflow. They don’t need another tool they won’t use. Get everything that 50 million people already love about Stack Overflow in a private, secure environment with Stack Overflow for Teams. Try it today, with your first 14 days free. Go to s.tk/daily Stack Overflow for teams gives your team the answers they need to be productive–with the same interface that Stack Overflow users are familiar with.
May 15, 2018
YouTube runs a large MySQL database to hold the metadata about its videos. As YouTube scaled, the database was sharded, and applications within YouTube had to write queries that were aware of the sharding layout of that database. This is problematic, because it pushes complexity to the application developer. An application developer shouldn’t have to be aware of how a database is laid out among different nodes. The developer should be able to issue a query, and have the cluster simply return the data. Vitess is an open source system for scaling large MySQL databases. Sugu Sougoumarane co-created Vitess at YouTube. Since YouTube is owned by Google, Vitess was able to leverage the Borg cluster manager developed at Google. Once Kubernetes came to market, it became more viable to make Vitess accessible to open source developers. Sugu joins the show to talk about the scalability problems that YouTube’s database infrastructure encountered and the motivations for building Vitess. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Every team has its own software, and every team has specific questions about that internal software stack. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure home for your team’s questions and answers. No more digging through stale wikis and lost emails—give your team back the time it needs to build better products. Your engineering team already knows and loves Stack Overflow. They don’t need another tool they won’t use. Get everything that 50 million people already love about Stack Overflow in a private, secure environment with Stack Overflow for Teams. Try it today, with your first 14 days free. Go to s.tk/daily Stack Overflow for teams gives your team the answers they need to be productive–with the same interface that Stack Overflow users are familiar with. Go to s.tk/daily to try it today, with your first 14 days free. Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily.   GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.
May 14, 2018
The Kubernetes ecosystem consists of enterprises, vendors, open source projects, and individual engineers. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation was created to balance the interests of all the different groups within the cloud native community. CNCF has similarities to the Linux Foundation and the Apache Foundation. CNCF helps to guide open source projects in the Kubernetes ecosystem–including Prometheus, Fluentd, and Envoy. With the help of the CNCF, these projects can find common ground where possible. KubeCon is a conference organized by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. I attended the most recent KubeCon in Copenhagen. KubeCon was a remarkably well-run conference–and the attendees were excited and optimistic. As much traction as Kubernetes has, it is still very early days and it was fun to talk to people and forecast what the future might bring. At KubeCon, I sat down with Chris Aniszczyk and Dan Kohn, who are the COO and director of the CNCF.  I was curious about how to scale an organization like the CNCF. In some ways, it is like scaling a government. Kubernetes is growing faster than Linux grew, and the applications of Kubernetes are as numerous as those of Linux. Different constituencies want different things out of Kubernetes–and as those constituencies rapidly grow in number, how do you maintain diplomacy among competing interests? It’s not an easy task, and that diplomacy has been established by keeping in mind lessons from previous open source projects. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors   Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily. This episode of Software Engineering Daily is sponsored by Datadog. Datadog integrates seamlessly with container technologies like Docker and Kubernetes, so you can monitor your entire container cluster in real time. See across all your servers, containers, apps, and services in one place, with powerful visualizations, sophisticated alerting, distributed tracing and APM. And now, Datadog has Application Performance Monitoring for Java. Start monitoring your microservices today with a free trial! As a bonus, Datadog will send you a free T-shirt. Visit softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog to get started. Octopus Deploy is a friendly deployment automation tool, taking over where your build/CI server ends. Use Octopus to promote releases on-prem or to the cloud. Octopus integrates with your existing build pipeline–TFS and VSTS, Bamboo, TeamCity, and Jenkins. It integrates with AWS, Azure, and on-prem environments. Reliably and repeatedly deploy your .NET and Java apps and more. If you can package it, Octopus can deploy it! It’s quick and easy to install. Go to Octopus.com to trial Octopus free for 45 days. That’s Octopus.com OutSystems is a platform for building low-code apps. Find out how to get started with low-code apps today–at OutSystems.com/sedaily. There are videos showing how to use the OutSystems development platform, and testimonials from enterprises like FICO, Mercedes Benz, and SafeWay. OutSystems enables you to quickly build web and mobile applications–whether you are an engineer or not. Check out how to build low-code apps by going to OutSystems.com/sedaily.
May 11, 2018
Mesos is a system for managing distributed systems. The goal of Mesos is to help engineers orchestrate resources among multi-node applications like Spark. Mesos can also manage lower level schedulers like Kubernetes. A common misconception is that Mesos aims to solve the same problem as Kubernetes, but Mesos is a higher level abstraction. Ben Hindman co-founded Mesosphere to bring the Mesos project to market. Large enterprises like Uber, Netflix, and Yelp use Mesosphere for resource management. Before he started the company, Ben worked in the Berkeley AMP Lab, a research program where the Spark and Tachyon projects were also born. At this point, he has spent significant time in both academia and industry. This conversation spans distributed systems theory, history, and practice. Ben and I spoke at KubeCon 2018 in Copenhagen–which was an amazing conference. We were both amazed at how big the audience for Kubernetes has gotten, and the pace at which the technology is advancing. Today, Kubernetes is mostly used for scheduling containerized applications that engineers have built themselves. But there will be higher level tools that use Kubernetes as a building block. Much like Zookeeper was used as a building block for Hadoop, Kubernetes will be used to build serverless applications and distributed databases. Once you are using a distributed database built on Kubernetes, you don’t want to think about the container orchestration–you want to think about the raw storage and CPU requirements for that database. This is one reason why Mesos is so compelling. Since Kubernetes creates an increased cardinality of distributed systems, it’s good to know that there is a framework built to manage those higher level applications. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Today’s podcast is sponsored by Datadog, a cloud-scale monitoring platform for infrastructure and applications. In Datadog’s new container orchestration report, Kubernetes holds a 41-percent share of Docker environments, a number that’s rising fast. As more companies adopt containers, and turn to Kubernetes to manage their containers, they need a comprehensive monitoring platform that’s built for dynamic, modern infrastructure. Datadog integrates seamlessly with more than 200 technologies, including Kubernetes and Docker, so you can monitor your entire container infrastructure in one place. And with Datadog’s new Live Container view, you can see every container’s health, resource consumption, and running processes in real time. See for yourself by starting a free trial and get a free Datadog T-shirt! softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog. Casper combines supportive memory foams for a sleep surface that’s got just the right sink and just the right bounce. Plus, its breathable design sleeps cool to help you regulate your temperature through the night. And, buying a Casper mattress is completely risk free. Casper offers free delivery and free returns with a 100-night home trial. If you don’t love it, they’ll pick it up and give you a full refund. As a special offer to Software Engineering Daily listeners, get $50 toward select mattresses by visiting casper.com/sedaily and using code SEDAILY at checkout. Terms and conditions apply. Segment allows us to gather customer data from anywhere and send that data to any analytics tool. Segment is the customer data infrastructure that has saved us from writing duplicate code across all of the different platforms that we want to analyze. And if you’re using cloud apps such as – Mailchimp, Marketo, Intercom, AppNexus, Zendesk–you can integrate with all of these different tools and centralize your customer data in one place–with Segment. To get a free 90-day trial, signup for Segment at segment.com and enter SEDaily in the “How did you hear about us box?” during signup. Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily.
May 10, 2018
Algorithms for building neural networks have existed for decades. For a long time, neural networks were not widely used. Recent changes to the cost of compute and the size of our data have made neural networks extremely useful. Our smart phones generate terabytes of useful data. Lower storage costs make it economical to keep that data. Cloud computing democratized the ability to do large scale machine learning across GPUs. Over the last few years, these trends have been driving widespread use of deep learning, in which neural nets with a large series of layers are used to create powerful results in various fields of classification and prediction. Neural networks are a tool for making sense of unstructured data–text, images, sound waves, and videos. “Unstructured” data is data with high volume or high dimensionality. For example, an image has a huge collection of pixels, and each pixel has a color value. One way to think about image classification is that you are finding correlations between those pixels. A certain cluster of pixels might represent an edge. After doing edge detection on pixels, you have a collection of edges. Then you can find correlations between those edges, and build up higher levels of abstraction. Yinyin Liu is a principal engineer and head of data science at the Intel AI products group. She studies techniques for building neural networks. Each different configuration of a neural network for a given problem is called a “topology.” Engineers are always looking at new topologies for solving a deep learning application–such as natural language processing. In this episode, Yinyin describes what a deep learning topology is and describes topologies for natural language processing. We also talk about the opportunities and the bottlenecks in deep learning–including why the tools are so immature, and what it will take to make the tooling better. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Segment allows us to gather customer data from anywhere and send that data to any analytics tool. Segment is the customer data infrastructure that has saved us from writing duplicate code across all of the different platforms that we want to analyze. And if you’re using cloud apps such as – Mailchimp, Marketo, Intercom, AppNexus, Zendesk–you can integrate with all of these different tools and centralize your customer data in one place–with Segment. To get a free 90-day trial, signup for Segment at segment.com and enter SEDaily in the “How did you hear about us box?” during signup. Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily. LiveRamp is one of the fastest growing companies in data connectivity in the Bay Area, and they are looking for senior level talent to join their team. LiveRamp helps the world’s largest brands activate their data to improve customer interactions on any channel or device. The infrastructure is at a tremendous scale: a 500-billion node identity graph generated from over a thousand data sources, running an 85PB hadoop cluster; and application servers that process over 20 billion HTTP requests per day. The LiveRamp team thrives on mind-bending technical challenges. LiveRamp members value entrepreneurship, humility, and constant personal growth. If this sounds like a fit for you, check out softwareengineeringdaily.com/liveramp. GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.
May 9, 2018
Cloud computing lowered the cost and improved accessibility to tools for storing large volumes of data. In the early 2000s, Hadoop caused a revolution in large scale batch processing. Since then, companies have been building ways to store and access their data faster and more efficiently. At the same time, the sheer volume of data has increased and machine learning has given rise to methods of extracting signal from seemingly inconsequential data points. This confluence of factors gave rise to the role of the data engineer. A data engineer defines the data pipeline and supports data scientists and machine learning engineers. Tobias Macey hosts the “Data Engineering Podcast,” where he covers the fast moving world of data engineering–including databases, cloud providers, and open source tools. Tobias and I covered a range of topics in the data engineering space and also spent significant time discussing the world of software engineering podcasting. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Today’s sponsor is Datadog, a monitoring and analytics platform for cloud-scale infrastructure and applications. Datadog integrates seamlessly with more than 200 technologies, so you can track every layer of your complex microservice architecture, all in one place. Distributed tracing and APM provide end-to-end visibility into requests wherever they go, across hosts, containers, and service boundaries. With rich dashboards, algorithmic alerts, and collaboration tools, Datadog provides your team with the tools they need to quickly troubleshoot and optimize modern applications. See for yourself – start a 14-day free trial today and Datadog will send you a free T-shirt! softwareengineeringdaily.com/datadog.  Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily. The octopus: a sea creature known for its intelligence and flexibility. Octopus Deploy: a friendly deployment automation tool for deploying applications like .NET apps, Java apps and more. Ask any developer and they’ll tell you it’s never fun pushing code at 5pm on a Friday then crossing your fingers hoping for the best. That’s where Octopus Deploy comes into the picture. Octopus Deploy is a friendly deployment automation tool, taking over where your build/CI server ends. Use Octopus to promote releases on-prem or to the cloud. Octopus integrates with your existing build pipeline–TFS and VSTS, Bamboo, TeamCity, and Jenkins. It integrates with AWS, Azure, and on-prem environments. Reliably and repeatedly deploy your .NET and Java apps and more. If you can package it, Octopus can deploy it! It’s quick and easy to install. Go to Octopus.com to trial Octopus free for 45 days. That’s Octopus.com There’s a new open source project called Dremio that is designed to simplify analytics. It’s also designed to handle some of the hard work, like scaling performance of analytical jobs. Dremio is the team behind Apache Arrow, a new standard for in-memory columnar data analytics. Arrow has been adopted across dozens of projects – like Pandas – to improve the performance of analytical workloads on CPUs and GPUs. It’s free and open source, designed for everyone, from your laptop, to clusters of over 1,000 nodes. At dremio.com/sedaily you can find all the necessary resources to get started with Dremio for free. If you like it, be sure to tweet @dremiohq and let them know you heard about it from Software Engineering Daily. Thanks again to Dremio, and check out dremio.com/sedaily to learn more.
May 8, 2018
Starting an Internet business is harder than it should be. You need to incorporate, create an operating agreement, set up a system to accept payments, and many other straightforward tasks. In the 1990s, this was how it felt to set up anything on the Internet. You always had to stand up a web server on your own infrastructure, before you could get to the interesting part–which was building an actual product. With the popularization of cloud computing, it became massively easier to stand up a server. Because of that lower activation energy, millions of applications and thousands of software businesses got started. But the activation energy required to start a business remains higher than necessary. It feels like standing up a web server in the 90s–lots of tedium and reinventing the wheel that has been done by people before you. This is the motivation behind Stripe Atlas, a project to simplify the process of starting an Internet business. Patrick McKenzie works on Atlas at Stripe. He was previously on the show to discuss his experience leaving a large corporation to work on his own small software companies. And his name has become synonymous with the modern phenomenon of the small software company–he has been writing about this topic for over a decade at Kalzumeus.com. It was great to talk to Patrick once again about Internet businesses, and I’m excited to see Stripe Atlas become something huge. Transcript Transcript provided by We Edit Podcasts. Software Engineering Daily listeners can go to weeditpodcasts.com/sed to get 20% off the first two months of audio editing and transcription services. Thanks to We Edit Podcasts for partnering with SE Daily. Please click here to view this show’s transcript. Sponsors Azure Container Service simplifies the deployment, management and operations of Kubernetes. You can continue to work with the tools you already know, such as Helm, and move applications to any Kubernetes deployment. Integrate with your choice of container registry, including Azure Container Registry. Also, quickly and efficiently scale to maximize your resource utilization without having to take your applications offline. Isolate your application from infrastructure failures and transparently scale the underlying infrastructure to meet growing demands—all while increasing the security, reliability, and availability of critical business workloads with Azure. Check out the Azure Container Service at aka.ms/sedaily. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to making your app “realtime.” PubNub makes it simple, enabling you to build immersive and interactive experiences on the web, on mobile phones, embedded into hardware, and any other device connected to the Internet. With powerful APIs, and a robust global infrastructure, you can stream geolocation data, send chat messages, turn on your sprinklers, or rock your baby’s crib when they start crying (PubNub literally powers IoT cribs). 70 SDKs for web, mobile, IoT, and more means you can start streaming data in realtime without a ton of compatibility headaches, and no need to build your own SDKs from scratch. Go to PubNub.com/sedaily to get started. They offer a generous sandbox tier that’s free forever (until your app takes off). Airtable is hiring creative engineers who believe in the importance of open-ended platforms that empower human creativity. Airtable is a uniquely challenging product to build, and they are looking for creative frontend and backend engineers to design systems on first principles— like a realtime sync layer, collaborative undo model, formulas engine, visual revision history, and more. Check out jobs at Airtable by going to airtable.com/sedaily. GoCD is a continuous delivery tool created by ThoughtWorks. GoCD agents use Kubernetes to scale as needed. Check out gocd.org/sedaily and learn about how you can get started. GoCD was built with the learnings of the ThoughtWorks engineering team, who have talked about building the product in previous episodes of Software Engineering Daily. It’s great to see the continued progress on GoCD with the new Kubernetes integrations–and you can check it out for yourself at gocd.org/sedaily.    

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