Cloud Engineering – Software Engineering Daily
By Cloud Engineering – Software Engineering Daily
About this podcast
Technical interviews about software topics.

Episodes (Total: 93)
June 20, 2017 · 00:44:01
Software architecture address the challenge of communicating and navigating large, complex systems to stakeholders, both technical and non-technical.  Over the years software architecture has gone in and out of fashion.  Today we discuss why software architecture is important, what it means to have software architecture, and how to properly structure teams and incorporate architecture. Today’s show is guest hosted by David Curry. David sits down with Simon Brown to discussContinue reading...
June 19, 2017 · 00:57:23
A self-driving car needs to be able to quickly respond to changes in driving conditions. A factory needs to be able to quickly respond to changes in workplace safety. For these kinds of applications, we need processing power closer to the user of the application. If we put all of our application logic in the cloud, we will have to make a network round trip for every request. Servers inContinue reading...
June 16, 2017 · 01:11:02
John Looney spent more than 10 years at Google. He started with infrastructure, and was part of the team that migrated Google File System to Colossus, the successor to GFS. Imagine migrating every piece of data on Google from one distributed file system to another. In this episode, John sheds light on the engineering culture that has made Google so successful. He has very entertaining stories about clusterops and site-reliabilityContinue reading...
June 8, 2017 · 00:51:10
Kubernetes makes it easier for engineering teams to manage their distributed systems architecture. But it’s still not simple to deploy and operate a Kubernetes cluster. Google Container Engine (GKE) is a managed control plane for Kubernetes. Just as developers can use Google App Engine to easily deploy monolithic apps against a platform as a service, we can use Google Container Engine to deploy microservices against a platform as a service.Continue reading...
June 6, 2017 · 01:02:28
DNS stands for domain name system. This is the naming system that maps the entire internet. It associates information with domain names. More specifically, DNS specifies mappings between numerical IP addresses and domain names. Most engineers know these basic facts about DNS, but they may not know how much engineering a complex company like Etsy or Zappos puts into their DNS configuration. Dynamic DNS allows for intelligent response, so thatContinue reading...
June 2, 2017 · 00:56:03
On January 31st 2017, GitLab experienced a major outage of their online repository hosting service. The primary database server experienced data loss due to a combination of malicious spam attacks and engineering mistakes that occurred while trying to respond to those spam attacks. GitLab responded to the event transparently. The company put up a postmortem describing the event in detail. In subsequent posts, GitLab expressed sympathy for the employee whoContinue reading...
May 25, 2017 · 00:53:13
Everyone in the world should have some basic level of guaranteed healthcare. This is not controversial. But what should that basic level of healthcare be? Should it extend into the later years of your life, when the majority of your health costs are incurred? And how much has modern technology driven down the cost of what it should cost to treat a patient? Healthcare today has lots of problems withContinue reading...
May 22, 2017 · 00:49:02
Many companies are transitioning from a monolith to microservices architecture. Tools for cloud computing, containerization, and continuous delivery are making this easier. But there are still technological and organizational challenges that a company will encounter while making this transition. Cassandra Shum is an engineer with ThoughtWorks. She has worked with major financial institutions and other large companies to architect their migrations from monolith to microservices. Also, she regularly puts onContinue reading...
May 19, 2017 · 01:00:08
Cloud computing changed how we develop applications for the web. Over the last decade, engineers have been learning how to build software in this new paradigm. The costs have gone down, but our nodes can fail at any time. We no longer have to manage individual servers, but the layers of virtualization and containerization require new strategies for communicating between services. As we have adjusted to this new way ofContinue reading...
May 17, 2017 · 00:52:55
Firebase is a backend-as-a-service. The key efficiency of a backend-as-a-service is that it enables developers to go from having a 3-tier architecture (client, server, database) to a 2-tier architecture (client, backend-as-a-service). The team who started Firebase built it as a pivot. They had started a social network, and then they realized there wasn’t a good backend for chat tools. And so they started a chat-as-a-service tool, for people who wantedContinue reading...
April 26, 2017 · 00:41:50
Spring Framework is an application framework for Java and JVM languages. Spring was originally built around dependency injection, but grew to become an entire ecosystem of tools and plugins for Java developers. Spring was originally released 15 years ago, and since then a lot has changed around application development. For example, many engineers deploy applications to the cloud in microservices architectures. The expectations around frameworks has also changed, with theContinue reading...
April 20, 2017 · 00:58:03
The word “microservices” started getting used after a series of events–companies were moving to cloud virtual machines. Those VMs got broken up into containers, and the containers can fit to the size of the service. Services that are more narrowly defined take up smaller containers, and can be packed more densely into the virtual machines–hence the term “microservices.” As this change to software architecture has occurred, the DevOps movement hasContinue reading...
April 12, 2017 · 00:58:30
Search is a common building block for applications. Whether we are searching Wikipedia or our log files, the behavior is similar: a query is entered and the most relevant documents are returned. The core data structure for search is an inverted index. Elasticsearch is a scalable, resilient search tool that shards and replicates a search index. Philipp Krenn from Elastic joins the show today to discuss how search works andContinue reading...
April 5, 2017 · 00:54:17
There are various standards at play when creating and consuming Application Program Interfaces (APIs).  These standards, though, are mostly technical and mostly lower-level than the content of the API. Andy Beier has experienced the broad range of API quality in his role with Domo in creating integrations with other businesses.  He has made standardization of good practices in creating APIs his mission, with an emphasis on making the right informationContinue reading...
March 29, 2017 · 00:54:17
Servers in a data center fail. Sometimes entire data centers have a power outage. Bugs in an application make it into production. Human operators make mistakes and cause data to be deleted. Failure is unavoidable. We make backups and replicate our servers so that when a failure occurs, we can quickly respond to it without making the user feel much pain. But how can we test that our response willContinue reading...
March 28, 2017 · 00:54:44
Designers and software engineers need to communicate with each other. From Apple to Slack to Uber, the emphasis on visual design within a product is rising in importance. Much like development and operations siloes have been bridged with the DevOps movement, design and engineering teams are working more closely together to align the vision of the designers with the realities of code. InVision is a product for prototyping designs andContinue reading...
March 16, 2017 · 00:49:41
If you are building a service that processes payments, your software architecture has a lot of requirements. Not only do you need to be highly available, consistent, and fast–you need to be PCI compliant. In this episode, we explore the infrastructure of Stripe with Evan Broder, who has been with the company for five years. Stripe started as a small payments company catering to developers with a monolithic code base.Continue reading...
March 15, 2017 · 01:06:50
Observability allows engineers to understand what is going on inside their systems. In its most raw form, observability comes from log data. Modern systems have many layers of logs–virtualized cloud infrastructure, container orchestration, the container runtime itself, and the application logic running within the container. With all of these layers, it is not practical for a developer to have to sift through layers of logs every time a bug occursContinue reading...
March 10, 2017 · 00:49:53
Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) is a powerful concept that has the potential to make for reliable and maintainable systems.  It is also broadly misunderstood and means different things to different people. Derek Comartin learned about the idea after viewing some talks by Greg Young and has since successfully applied the approach with great success and it has transformed the way he views features, business requirements, and dependencies.  The resultContinue reading...
March 8, 2017 · 00:51:03
Load testing measures performance of a system undergoing a large volume of requests. Before an application is pushed to production, engineers will often load test their software to ensure it is resilient in the face of high traffic. As web applications have changed, the requirements around load testing have changed as well. External APIs, internal undocumented APIs, and proprietary databases are black boxes that you might not be able toContinue reading...