Urban (audio)
By World Bank's Open Learning Campus
About this podcast
The Open Learning Campus provides convenient and reliable access to the latest developments in topics, which address complex, real-world issues in priority areas such as governance, health, cities, climate change and public private partnerships.

Episodes (Total: 27)
March 21, 2017 · 00:09:52
Module 5.5
March 21, 2017 · 00:11:00
Module 5.6
March 21, 2017 · 00:13:57
Module 5.5
March 21, 2017 · 00:10:05
Module 5.4
March 21, 2017 · 00:10:55
Module 1.3b
March 21, 2017 · 00:07:45
Module 1.3a
March 21, 2017 · 00:10:25
Module 5.3
March 21, 2017 · 00:09:25
Module 5.2
March 21, 2017 · 00:14:26
Module 4.1
March 21, 2017 · 00:10:13
Module 4.1
Oct. 20, 2015 · 00:08:15
The percentage of the world’s population that lives in cities is rising, approaching 70 percent by 2050. Rapid urbanization – particularly among the growing middle class in many low-income and emerging economies – is changing the traditional dynamics of energy systems and supply globally. Green growth strategies can help economies and societies become more resilient as they work to meet demand for food production, transport, housing, energy, and water. For example, lighting and cooling of buildings already make up half of global energy use, and by 2030 building-related GHG emissions are set to double, with emerging markets contributing the majority of emissions. Energy efficiency is widely recognized as one of the most effective ways to combat climate change while meeting rising energy demand. Information and communication technology (ICT) is an important driver for clean-tech and green growth. It enables the collection and processing of immense volumes of data that can be used for improved urban systems and new business models. It also allows developing countries to adapt successfully tested international solutions to their local needs, which can help them leapfrog and develop domestic clean technology markets. The Negawatt Challenge taps into local and global talent to identify hardware and software solutions that can reduce urban energy use, improve quality of service delivery in energy sectors, generate new or improved data, and offer cost-efficient energy management tools for city residents and policymakers. In its first stage, focusing on resource efficiency and open data, the Negawatt has been piloted in four cities globally, including Accra, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, and Rio de Janeiro. It aims to use an open innovation competition methodology to surface technology and business innovations that catalyze behavioral change and have the potential to transform cities into more sustainable and efficient places.
Oct. 8, 2015 · 00:07:59
The percentage of the world’s population that lives in cities is rising, approaching 70 percent by 2050. Rapid urbanization – particularly among the growing middle class in many low-income and emerging economies – is changing the traditional dynamics of energy systems and supply globally. Green growth strategies can help economies and societies become more resilient as they work to meet demand for food production, transport, housing, energy, and water. For example, lighting and cooling of buildings already make up half of global energy use, and by 2030 building-related GHG emissions are set to double, with emerging markets contributing the majority of emissions. Energy efficiency is widely recognized as one of the most effective ways to combat climate change while meeting rising energy demand. Information and communication technology (ICT) is an important driver for clean-tech and green growth. It enables the collection and processing of immense volumes of data that can be used for improved urban systems and new business models. It also allows developing countries to adapt successfully tested international solutions to their local needs, which can help them leapfrog and develop domestic clean technology markets. The Negawatt Challenge taps into local and global talent to identify hardware and software solutions that can reduce urban energy use, improve quality of service delivery in energy sectors, generate new or improved data, and offer cost-efficient energy management tools for city residents and policymakers. In its first stage, focusing on resource efficiency and open data, the Negawatt has been piloted in four cities globally, including Accra, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, and Rio de Janeiro. It aims to use an open innovation competition methodology to surface technology and business innovations that catalyze behavioral change and have the potential to transform cities into more sustainable and efficient places. With Alison Roadburg, Program Manager, iSpace Foundation Ghana
Sept. 24, 2015 · 00:10:54
The percentage of the world’s population that lives in cities is rising, approaching 70 percent by 2050. Rapid urbanization – particularly among the growing middle class in many low-income and emerging economies – is changing the traditional dynamics of energy systems and supply globally. Green growth strategies can help economies and societies become more resilient as they work to meet demand for food production, transport, housing, energy, and water. For example, lighting and cooling of buildings already make up half of global energy use, and by 2030 building-related GHG emissions are set to double, with emerging markets contributing the majority of emissions. Energy efficiency is widely recognized as one of the most effective ways to combat climate change while meeting rising energy demand. Information and communication technology (ICT) is an important driver for clean-tech and green growth. It enables the collection and processing of immense volumes of data that can be used for improved urban systems and new business models. It also allows developing countries to adapt successfully tested international solutions to their local needs, which can help them leapfrog and develop domestic clean technology markets. The Negawatt Challenge taps into local and global talent to identify hardware and software solutions that can reduce urban energy use, improve quality of service delivery in energy sectors, generate new or improved data, and offer cost-efficient energy management tools for city residents and policymakers. In its first stage, focusing on resource efficiency and open data, the Negawatt has been piloted in four cities globally, including Accra, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, and Rio de Janeiro. It aims to use an open innovation competition methodology to surface technology and business innovations that catalyze behavioral change and have the potential to transform cities into more sustainable and efficient places.
May 27, 2015 · 00:09:41
Cities can re-validate and rejuvenate urban services that reflect both the needs of citizens and those of the city hall by asking citizens to contribute to the design of services, products, business models and environments. Various instruments such as crowdsourcing campaigns, offline meetings and interactive policy workshops can be used to open up the planning process to citizens. Beyond the contribution to the city’s overall innovation policy, such strategies increase ‘innovation literacy’ among civil servants allowing the city hall to adopt a more agile approach to implement innovation by using service design and rapid prototyping methods. This enables administration to better address complex urban problems by engaging users and citizens in planning process. Examples from Amsterdam (Chief Technology Office) show how cities can foster civic innovation, entrepreneurship and re-thinking of city spaces through implementing specific strategies, thematic programs and flagship projects. Speaker: Ms. Katalin Gallyas, Open Innovation Manager, CTO Office, City of Amsterdam
Dec. 17, 2014 · 00:07:22
In an age of rapid urbanization, the delivery of quality public services by local governments will become more difficult and critical at the same time. The potential for e-Government to help meet these urban challenges has been widely acknowledged but there is a deficiency of e-Government initiatives that are focused on city -- rather than national -- agenda. This podcast, based on the webinar of the same name, is presented by Mr. Frederick Lim, WeGO IT Consultant, accompanied by a City Case Study presentation by WeGO member city, Ulyanovsk Region, Russia, and will provide an overview to the CeDS toolkit. The City e-Government Diagnostic and Solution (CeDS) toolkit, based on a partnership between the World Bank, the Seoul Metropolitan Government and WeGO, was developed and designed specifically for cities.
Dec. 12, 2014 · 00:07:21
A podcast that takes a closer look at a toolkit designed for the smart cities of the developing world.
Nov. 8, 2014 · 00:09:39
Speakers from Africa and the Caribbean will share their experiences on how to address the widening gap between the public and private sectors in their effective use of technology and design, by focusing on building civic technology capacity within civil societies and partnership with local governments. Code for Africa (CfAfrica) is the continent's largest open data initiative, using technology and data to help citizens shape their governments and hold those in power to account. CfAfrica currently has country-based programmes in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa.
June 4, 2014 · 00:09:30
Las políticas nacionales de vivienda asequible y mejoramiento integral de barrios en Colombia están construidas sobre el éxito de las experiencias locales para la pobreza urbana, especialmente aquellas de Medellín y Bogotá. El enfoque comprehensivo de Medellín combinó la integración física, social y económica de las áreas de desarrollo incompleto a la estructura de la ciudad mediante mejoras en la infraestructura, la promoción de la inclusión social e inversiones en desarrollo económico. Para promover intervenciones locales y mejorar las alternativas de vivienda, el gobierno nacional lanzó dos programas como parte de la estrategia de “Ciudades Amables” del Plan de Desarrollo 2006-2010. El programa de Macroproyectos de Interés Social Nacional (MISN), se impulsó a partir de un nuevo marco regulatorio de planeación del suelo centralizado y un modelo de intervención público- privado, establecidos para facilitar el acceso a la tierra para vivienda asequible. El programa de mejoramiento integral de barrios (PMIB), definió proyectos pilotos en varias ciudades intermedias para fortalecer la capacidad de los gobiernos locales en la implementación y gestión de intervenciones de mejoramiento en barrios de origen informal. El Señor Julio Gómez hablará sobre las lecciones aprendidas de la experiencia con estos dos programas y otros actualmente en curso en Colombia.
May 27, 2014 · 00:09:19
A podcast that highlights chapters from the book, "Financing Metropolitan Governments in Developing Countries" co-Edited by Johannes Linn and publiished in April 2013.
May 22, 2014 · 00:09:06
A podcast that highlights chapters from the book, "Financing Metropolitan Governments in Developing Countries" co-Edited by Johannes Linn and publiished in April 2013.