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Podcast – Technical.ly
About this podcast
Better cities through technology.
Episodes (Total: 10)
Sept. 21, 2015
We don't even know the complexities of what we're attempting. That's what Drexel University professor Youngmoo Kim tells us In the September edition of the Technical.ly Podcast, recorded live.
Sept. 21, 2015
As a good rule, when we make a bet as to how advanced we will be in the future, we overshoot. Insert here a reference to the Back to the Future movie franchise, which was partly set in oh-so-futuristic 2015. So the smart money is on the idea that we’re generations away from truly sentient artificial intelligence, a moment called the technological singularity, as popularized by futurist Ray Kurzweil, though others had used the phrase before. “You can’t just plot the moment on a map for 2015,” said Youngmoo Kim, the mild-mannered Drexel University electrical engineering professor and director of its cross-displinary ExCITe Center. “It’s never that simple.” Kim is cautious in his predictions of an impending machine takeover, as he shares in this month’s Technical.ly Podcast — recorded live as part of the third annual Philadelphia Podcast Festival upstairs at Tattooed Mom on South Street. But he doesn’t underestimate the rate and expansiveness of advances in computing power. Kim is both a classically trained musician and in possession of a Ph.D. from MIT, so he’s known for his thoughtful approaches for the ways that art and technology, analog and digital, machine and human come together. He works with music-playing robots and knows they can be difficult. He took a sabbatical last year to work with Opera Philadelphia to explore creative mashups of art and technology. Humans are imperfect, so our tests are too. History will no doubt remember that last year a computer system passed for the first time the legendary Turing Test by convincing people it was a 13-year-old boy and that this June a robot successfully solved the “King’s Wise Men” puzzle, another artificial intelligence marker. But we’re already creating new goals. One day we just might wake up with truly conscious artificial intelligence but these recent landmark successes just show challenging this work is, Kim said, noting what incredible research went into getting that far. But the counter argument is usually that these advances are expected to increase exponentially, as does computing power and brain scanning. That’s what futurist Kurzweil argues. Given that we’ve always used media to explore our relationship to these changes — more recently with popular films like Ex Machina — it’s clear we’re eager to understand this coming relationship. Listen to this month’s podcast to hear more. Here’s a rough outline of our conversation: Welcome and definitions: What is the singularity? What is the most compelling research happening in this area? Are we seeing the exponential advances we so often predict? How do depictions in media of AI help or hurt its development? Does a robot with a name make a promise it can’t keep? What actual technologies are standing in the way of us reaching the singularity? Is this inevitable?
May 7, 2015
Crowdfunding: Where it's been, where it's going and how you can do it better.
May 7, 2015
Starting way back in the early aughts, when ecommerce software and online social sharing norms had advanced just far enough to unite, we saw the first experiments in what we now call crowdfunding. There was ArtistShare for musicians in 2003, EquityNet for accredited investors in 2005, Spot.us for journalists in 2008. Then the big guns: Indiegogo in 2008 and Kickstarter in 2009. Now crowdfunding is a $16.2-billion industry — and poised to expand even further as the federal JOBS Act broadens the pool of potential investors that young ventures can reach out to. This month on the Technical.ly Podcast we explore what’s next for crowdfunding, and discuss some tips and tricks for how to successfully raise money (and attention) from the crowd. First, we speak with Erin Glenn, the CEO of Quire (formerly Alphaworks). The equity crowdfunding platform lets backers get more than just a T-shirt for supporting a business: they get a sliver of the company, instead. Glenn explains how the JOBS Act is changing things. Then we speak with Technical.ly contributor Jim Saksa. In a two-part series for Techincal.ly Philly, Saksa unpacked what crowdfunding is really all about (hint: marketing) and talked to founders about the secrets of running a successful crowdfunding campaign. Listen below, download the episode or subscribe to the Technical.ly Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. It’s also available via this RSS feed. We also have a very special giveaway this month. The makers of the wildly popular Serial podcast are coming to Philadelphia on Thursday, May 14, for an event at the Merriam Theater. For a free pair of tickets, review the Technical.ly Podcast on iTunes, take a screenshot of your review and send it to cary@technical.ly. We’ll select one listener at random.
April 2, 2015
This month's podcast explores the innovation legacy on which current ventures are built.
April 2, 2015
We did it live. And it went off without a hitch. Last week Technical.ly experimented with a podcast live show — complete with an audio timeline, personal essays and interpretive dancers. It was fun. Full audience and awesome speakers at @Technical_ly's LIVE podcast recording #PTW15 pic.twitter.com/7DaBhFkrSo — Philly Tech Week (@PhillyTechWeek) March 25, 2015 This month’s podcast explores the innovation legacy on which current ventures are built. How do we build on the past? How do we create a more inclusive tech community? How do we choose where to live? We explored those topics in front of a live audience, and now you can hear the show in its entirety. Listen below, download the episode or subscribe to the Technical.ly Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. It’s also available via this RSS feed. A big shoutout to electronic musician Pixel8ter who performed live. And a huge thanks to our producer, John Myers, who’s available for podcast mixing and production. Check out his website. We couldn’t recommend him more highly.
March 5, 2015
There’s a lot of methodologies out there for getting stuff done. You’ve got rapid iteration, you’ve got Lean, in the software realm you’ve got Agile. But in this month’s Technical.ly Podcast we’re talking about design thinking. It’s solutions-based thinking, building simpler processes for more complex issues — and industries across the board are adopting the approach to get consumers more comfortable with an always changing future. Natalie Nixon runs an MBA program at Philadelphia University that teaches design thinking to students from a wide range of fields. The school’s Strategic Design MBA program hosted its first class in 2013. We catch up with Nixon to see what design thinking is all about. (For seven principles to keep in mind for leading with design thinking, be sure to check out Nixon’s recent article on Inc.com.) After that, from one of the global homes of design culture, we talk to Technical.ly Brooklyn lead reporter Brady Dale about how design culture is spreading out from Dumbo creative agencies to the wider business world. Listen below, download the episode or subscribe to the Technical.ly Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.
March 5, 2015
It's solutions-based thinking — and it's not just for designers. This month we speak with one expert in Philly and our lead reporter in Brooklyn about why design thinking is having a moment.
Feb. 4, 2015
Finding talent needs to be better suited to today's economic realities. Here's how people within academia and the startup world are tackling the issue.
Feb. 4, 2015
If you want an economy for the future, you’re gonna need the right people to lead it. This month’s Technical.ly Podcast is all about recruiting: on both the macro level (for cities) and the micro level (for companies eyeing the next member of the team). Within both academia and the private sector, people are thinking about how the process of finding talent needs to be better suited to today’s economic realities. We speak with the University of California, San Diego’s Mary Walshok, an expert who has weighed the various elements that make up a successful startup scene. Then it’s a conversation with dating consultant-turned-startup founder Steve Dean. His Jobsuitors wants to be the OkCupid of job recruiting. The idea is get “dealbreakers” on the table from both prospective employees and employers — so that the hiring process is much more transparent and honest. It all comes as Technical.ly prepares for job fairs in three of its markets. NET/WORK is coming to Philadelphia (Feb. 10), Baltimore (Feb. 19) and Delaware (March 12) in a matter of weeks. And if you really want to dig in to innovative strategies for hiring top talent, check out our ebook, Beyond Recruiting, which we released last fall. Listen below, download the episode or subscribe to the Technical.ly Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher.
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