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Upaya Zen Center
By Joan Halifax | Zen Buddhist Teacher Upaya Abbot
About this podcast
This weekly Podcast includes the Wednesday evening "Dharma Talks (audio)" from Upaya Zen Center and supports our mission: to provide a context for community practice, education in Buddhism and social service in the areas of death and dying, prison work, the environment, womens rights and peace-work. Our vision focuses on the integration of practice and social action, bringing together wisdom and compassion.
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Episodes (Total: 10)
yesterday · 00:35:14
Episode Description: In this talk, Sensei Shinzan Palma reflects on the meaning of finding stillness and wholeheartedly showing up to our lives. Shinzan looks at this in light of the teachings of Zen Master Shitou when he says, “What the eyes meet is the way.” Shinzan says, “As soon as we can start accepting this body and mind, we start walking the way.” He speaks of the importance of staying present and not running away from ourselves in search of enlightenment. “Zazen is to go to the root; what does it mean to be human? It teaches us how to connect to ourselves and how to connect to nature.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Sensei Shinzan Palma Sensei Jose Shinzan Palma was born in Veracruz, Mexico. He is a Zen priest and Dharma Successor of Roshi Joan Halifax. He has been practicing Zen since 1996. Shinzan lived in the Toronto Zen... More
Jan. 14, 2018 · 01:15:40
Episode Description: During this session, Frank Ostaseski and Roshi Joan Halifax lead a Q&A period. They discuss and explore how we can approach death with courage, wisdom, and compassion. Frank leads a group exercise where he poses the questions: What is a way in which you resist vulnerability? What is a way in which you experience courage? To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Frank Ostaseski Frank is a pioneer in contemplative end of life care. In 1987, he co-founded the Zen Hospice Project, the first Buddhist hospice in America. In 2004, he created the Metta Institute to provide... More Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Jan. 13, 2018 · 01:07:44
Episode Description: In this episode, Frank Ostaseski explores the meaning of courage. “Courage is the heart’s answer… When we’re driven by fear we often lack common sense,” he says. He talks about opening oneself to and learning from fear and doubt. “The willingness to open to our fear is also the willingness to be transformed by it,” he says, “it’s not enough to love nirvana, you have to love the walk up the mountain… to live a life of integrity, we have to not just love the goal, but we have to love the walk, the way.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Frank Ostaseski Frank is a pioneer in contemplative end of life care. In 1987, he co-founded the Zen Hospice Project, the first Buddhist hospice in America. In 2004, he created the Metta Institute to provide... More Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Jan. 8, 2018 · 00:37:47
Episode Description: In this “way-seeking mind” talk, Kigaku Noah Rossetter reflects on how he came to the Dharma and looks at how the ideas of renunciation and practicing “nothing extra” related to his path of practice–from entering solitary retreat at the Prajna Mountain Forest Refuge, to serving in the Nomads Clinic in Nepal, to residency at Upaya, and ordaining as a Zen Novice Priest. “The turbulence of the mind is an inside job,” he says, “our mind is the source of our suffering and can be the source of our happiness.” To Kigaku, solitary retreat, the Nomads Clinic, priesthood, and his former residency at Upaya are all beautiful examples of practicing the “nothing extra” way of life. “The extra stuff wasn’t out there that I needed to get rid of, but rather it was the attachments of my own mind that caused myself and others suffering,” he says. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Kigaku Noah RossetterNovice Priest Kigaku Noah Rossetter first came to Upaya for the 2010 Winter Practice Period, and later in the summer, he attended a Wilderness Fast at the Prajna Mountain Forest Refuge, following which he... More
Jan. 8, 2018 · 00:58:08
Episode Description: In this talk, the second session of this program, Roshi Joan Halifax asks: how do we cultivate a strong back and an open heart? “Empathy is when the world truly enters you,” she says. Roshi looks at ways in which we can approach suffering with strength and openness. “If you’re going to sit in the midst of your own difficulties, you have to be open to them. And yet, sometimes we’re completely defended, or dazed.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Jan. 7, 2018 · 00:49:06
Series Description: This whole life is a place where we can make real and right our dedication to awakening, in living and dying, in caring and being cared for. Being completely and vividly present for the rich details of our lives and the lives of others is the means that we use to transform our anguish, discover truth, and serve. Living and dying then is an experience of discovery, and this program, led by two pioneers in the end-of-life care field, is an exploration of how we bring depth and dedication into our whole lives and the life of the world. Through teachings, exchanges, and unique practices and processes, we explore the following areas: engaged practice and ethics, community dynamics and the shadow, developing compassion and wisdom as we care for ourselves and others, and practices and processes that cultivate our skills in being fully human. Episode Description: In the first session of this program, Roshi Joan Halifax reflects on what can be learned through practicing awareness of death and being with dying. “Death touches all of us. In some way it is a great equalizer,” she says. Frank Ostaseski conducts a group exercise where he poses the question: What is a moment you have turned towards and turned away from life, death, and freedom? To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Frank Ostaseski Frank is a pioneer in contemplative end of life care. In 1987, he co-founded the Zen Hospice Project, the first Buddhist hospice in America. In 2004, he created the Metta Institute to provide... More Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Jan. 1, 2018 · 00:58:16
Episode Description: On the sixth and last full day of Rohatsu Sesshin, Sensei Kaz Tanahashi explores the concepts of oneness and non-duality. “Oneness or non-duality can be the basis of all our actions,” he says. Roshi Enkyo O’Hara encourages us to remember the vast oneness that carries us throughout our lives. When engaging with the world we need to “show up in a way where we hear this ‘second melody’ of oneness,” she says. Roshi Joan Halifax discusses expanding our sense of subjectivity and realizing interdependency in the midst of suffering. “Our work in a way is to allow ourselves to be inhabited, imbued with, infused with coherence, so that we can meet the world of suffering… like a lotus blooming in a sea of fire.”  To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Sensei Kaz Tanahashi Kazuaki Tanahashi, born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian... More Roshi Enkyo O'HaraAbbot of Village Zendo in New York City Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara, PhD, is the Abbot of The Village Zendo in downtown Manhattan. A Soto Zen priest and... More Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Dec. 31, 2017 · 00:52:13
Episode Description: In this talk, on the fifth day of Rohatsu Sesshin, Sensei Kaz Tanahashi discusses the teachings of no-self and emptiness. “The ‘I’ changes all the time… there are no boundaries, we are free of boundaries and differentiations,” he says. Roshi Enkyo O’Hara speaks of the importance of dropping away concepts and ideas and fully experiencing interdependency. “It’s not about understanding, but experiencing with the whole body the awareness that this jewel of Buddha nature is right here, is you,” she says. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Sensei Kaz Tanahashi Kazuaki Tanahashi, born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian... More Roshi Enkyo O'HaraAbbot of Village Zendo in New York City Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara, PhD, is the Abbot of The Village Zendo in downtown Manhattan. A Soto Zen priest and... More
Dec. 26, 2017 · 01:01:32
Episode Description: On the fourth day of Rohatsu Sesshin, Sensei Kaz Tanahashi discusses the importance of bowing and forms in Zen practice. “We are making everything we do in sesshin sacred… Bowing is acknowledging the awakened nature of others.” Kaz reflects on the miracle of everyday life activity. “We can breath. That is a miracle,” he says. Roshi Joan Halifax talks about the rareness and value of life, and how we manifest it is our own responsibility. Zen practice allows us to notice how we are showing up in the world. “Everything we do in sesshin points to how we manifest our lives,” she says. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Sensei Kaz Tanahashi Kazuaki Tanahashi, born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian... More Roshi Joan Halifax, PhDAbbot Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen... More
Dec. 18, 2017 · 00:55:56
Episode Description: In this talk, on the third day of Rohatsu Sesshin, Sensei Kaz Tanahashi talks about how practice is an opportunity to “explore what is most essential in the life of each one of us.” Aside from our individualistic concerns, he asks: What is most important? What is our life doing? What is the meaning of it? Roshi Enkyo O’Hara asks, “how do we draw the line between the one and the many?” She says, “we need to turn the light around to observe the self, it is the key to our transformation, our insight.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Donate $25 Here Sensei Kaz Tanahashi Kazuaki Tanahashi, born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian... More Roshi Enkyo O'HaraAbbot of Village Zendo in New York City Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara, PhD, is the Abbot of The Village Zendo in downtown Manhattan. A Soto Zen priest and... More